Madeline K. Sofia Madeline Sofia is the host of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.
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Madeline K. Sofia

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Maddie
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Madeline K. Sofia

Host, Science Desk

Madeline Sofia is the host of Short Wave — NPR's daily science podcast. Short Wave will bring a little science into your life, all in about 10 minutes. Sometimes it'll be a good story, a smart conversation, or a fun explainer, but it'll always be interesting and easy to understand. It's a break from the relentless news cycle, but you'll still come away with a better understanding of the world around you.

Before hosting Short Wave, Sofia hosted the NPR video show "Maddie About Science." The show takes viewers behind the scenes with scientists, revealing their motivations and sharing their research — from insect mimics to space probes headed for the sun. Sofia also co-developed the worldwide NPR Scicommers program, which supports scientists interested in building their communication skills.

Before working at NPR, Sofia received her Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of Rochester Medical Center. She studied Vibrio cholerae, a fascinating bacterium that has haunted the human race.

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Story Archive

This Scientist Is Working To Get More Girls Up Into Tree Canopies

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How Magic Mushrooms Can Help Smokers Kick The Habit

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Studying active volcanoes can be dangerous, which is why a group of scientists from around the world came together to simulate volcanic blasts. What they're learning will help them at a real eruption. NPR hide caption

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Eastern hellbenders live throughout the Appalachian region in the United States. NPR hide caption

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VIDEO: Snot Otters Get A Second Chance In Ohio

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How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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Northern elephant seals recognize each other's voices based on rhythm and pitch. Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology hide caption

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Threat call of a northern elephant seal

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