Rhaina Cohen Rhaina Cohen is an associate producer at Hidden Brain.
Rhaina Cohen
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Rhaina Cohen

Rhaina Cohen
Rhaina Cohen

Rhaina Cohen

Associate Producer, Hidden Brain

Rhaina Cohen is an associate producer for the social science show Hidden Brain. She's especially proud of episodes she produced on why sexual assault allegations are now being taken seriously, on obstacles to friendship that men face and why we rehash difficult memories.

She got her start in public radio as an intern for Planet Money. Before entering the audio world, Cohen was part of the production team for ABC News' This Week with George Stephanopoulos. She also worked as a research assistant for Rebecca Traister on the New York Times bestselling book All The Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation, and for Peter Slevin on the biography Michelle Obama: A Life.

As a Marshall Scholar, Cohen received a master's in comparative social policy from Oxford (and while there, competed in a dance style that hasn't yet gained ground in the United States: acrobatic rock'n'roll). She holds a bachelor's degree in American studies from Northwestern University. In college and graduate school she researched family policies, traveling to Denmark, Iceland and a U.S. military base. As a 2018 FASPE fellow, she studied journalism ethics in Germany and Poland.

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Story Archive

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We're All Gonna Die! How Fear Of Death Drives Our Behavior

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado.John Moore/Getty Images John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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Every time you give in to your phone or computer that's buzzing with notifications, you pay a price: little by little, you lose your ability to focus. Veronica Grech/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible — but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist, and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Others We Can't Forget

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Our voices convey so much more than just information. They can tell other people something essential about who we are. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh
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Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute humanlike qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Pets, Pests And Food: Our Complex, Contradictory Attitudes Toward Animals

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A recent study found that black doctors were more effective than non-black doctors at convincing black men to use preventative health services. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

People Like Us: How Our Identities Shape Health And Educational Success

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Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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New research suggests that early investments in children's education can have benefits that last for more than one generation. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Muslim women praying together in Istiqlal mosque, Jakarta, Indonesia. Afriadi Hikmal/Getty Images hide caption

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Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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