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The Senate has confirmed a number of judges nominated by President Trump to the federal bench, including two additions to the Supreme Court. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Andrea Cappelli/Picture Press/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Too Little, Too Much: How Poverty and Wealth Affect Our Minds

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On October 30, 1935, a Boeing plane known as the "flying fortress" crashed during a military demonstration in Ohio — shocking the aviation industry and prompting questions about the future of flight. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

Jana Mestecky (left) poses for a cast photo during production of the play Des rats et des hommes, directed by Israel Horovitz (front, third from left). The photo appeared in the French magazine, L'Avant-Scène, in 1994. Courtesy of Jana Mestecky hide caption

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Courtesy of Jana Mestecky

Why Now?

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Rates of "summer melt" are highest for students from lower-income backgrounds, especially if their own parents didn't go through the college application process. Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Hill Street Studios/Getty Images/Blend Images

Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

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After a long history of civil war and corruption, many Liberians didn't trust their government's attempts to control Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Don't Panic! What We Can Learn From Chaos

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