The Kitchen Sisters The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson & Nikki Silva) are the executive producers, along with Jay Allison, of the DuPont Award-winning Hidden Kitchens series.
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The Kitchen Sisters

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Collecting The Work Of Lenny Bruce

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Henri Langlois created The Cinémathèque Française — an archive dedicated to preserving and exhibiting movies from many countries and eras. Jack Robinson/Condé Nast via Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Robinson/Condé Nast via Getty Images

'Savior Of Film,' Henri Langlois, Began Extensive Cinema Archive In His Bathtub

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Producer 9th Wonder speaks with student staff members at The HipHop Archive & Research Institute in Jan. 2018. Harold Shawn /Courtesy of The Hiphop Archive & Research Institute at Harvard hide caption

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Harold Shawn /Courtesy of The Hiphop Archive & Research Institute at Harvard

Keepers Of The Underground: The Hiphop Archive At Harvard

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Golden State Warriors Take On San Quentin Prisoners In Basketball

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Poet Emily Dickinson Was A Much Loved Baker

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In 2014, about 2,300 people in Seoul made 250 tons of kimchi, a traditional fermented South Korean pungent vegetable dish, to donate to neighbors in preparation for winter. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

How South Korea Uses Kimchi To Connect To The World — And Beyond

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A group of men clean a week's haul of seabird eggs. Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences hide caption

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Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences

The Gold-Hungry Forty-Niners Also Plundered Something Else: Eggs

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Shokugeki no Soma is about a boy named Sōma Yukihira who dreams of becoming a chef. Courtesy of VIZ Media hide caption

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Courtesy of VIZ Media

Food Manga: Where Culture, Conflict And Cooking All Collide

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Quiosque de Refresco do Largo da Sé, in Alfama, Lisbon. More than a century and a half ago, these ornate little kiosks began cropping up in the city's parks and plazas, becoming the heart of public life. But they fell into disrepair and all but disappeared, until an architect and an entrepreneur joined forces to restore them to their former glory and place of prominence. Paul Arps/Flickr hide caption

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Paul Arps/Flickr

History, Horchata And Hope: How Classic Kiosks Are Boosting Lisbon's Public Life

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"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union soldier wrote in 1865. (Above) Union soldiers sit with their coffee in tin cups, their hard-tack, and a kettle at their feet. Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

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Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images

Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

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Curtis Carroll — also known as "Wall Street" — teaches prisoners at San Quentin State Prison about stocks. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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The Kitchen Sisters

Inmate With Stock Tips Wants To Be San Quentin's Warren Buffett

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Blue agaves grow in a plantation for the production of tequila in Arandas, Jalisco state, Mexico, in December 2010. In the past 20 years, tequila has become fashionable all over the world, demonstrating that producers' international sales strategy has been a great success. Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images

Tequila Nation: Mexico Reckons With Its Complicated Spirit

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Australian celebrity chef and author Kylie Kwong (left) teaches a cooking workshop at Yaama Dhiyaan, a cooking and hospitality school for at-risk aborginal youth. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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The Kitchen Sisters

In Yabbies And Cappuccino, A Culinary Lifeline For Aboriginal Youth

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