Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

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Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

Story Archive

In the wake of the overturning of Roe v. Wade last Friday, abortion-rights activists continue to fight against laws restricting access to abortion. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

John Hinckley Jr., pictured in November 2003, arrives at U.S. District Court in Washington. As of Wednesday, President Ronald Reagan's would-be assassin is no longer under court-mandated legal or mental health supervision. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Coroner says he'll never be the same after being called to the Uvalde shooting scene

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Justice of the Peace Eulalio Diaz, Jr., was called to identify the bodies of the 21 victims of the shooting at Robb Elementary, last week. Vanessa Romo/NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Romo/NPR

Celeste Ibarra and her daughter, Aubriella Melchor, who survived the mass shooting on Tuesday, prayed with members of the Journey Riders, Sons of God Motorcycle Club, including Adam Torres (far left) at Murphy USA gas station in Uvalde, Texas. Vanessa Romo/NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Romo/NPR

Uvalde shooting survivors seek comfort anywhere, including in the arms of bikers

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Jersey is a one-year-old female mixed breed. She is available for adoption at the Pike County Animal Shelter. Maggie Epling/Maggie Epling hide caption

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Maggie Epling/Maggie Epling

The man behind the Pentagon Papers weighs in on Roe v. Wade leak

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Daniel Ellsberg, pictured in 2010, told NPR that anyone who chooses to take on the burden of leaking government documents in the public interest "is doing this republic a very great service and helping it to remain a republic." Leon Neal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/AFP via Getty Images

Maria Hinojosa, pictured in 2017, told NPR she encourages journalists to "Trust your gut about what's a story. But then also be prepared to bring some heart into it." Andy Kropa/Andy Kropa/Invision/AP hide caption

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Andy Kropa/Andy Kropa/Invision/AP

Tampa Bay Times reporters Corey G. Johnson, right, Rebecca Woolington, center, and Eli Murray, left, are announced as the winners of the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting on Monday. The winning series, "Poisoned," exposed dangers at Florida's only lead smelter. Ivy Ceballo/Tampa Bay Times/TNS/ABACA via Reuters hide caption

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Ivy Ceballo/Tampa Bay Times/TNS/ABACA via Reuters