Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
Stories By

Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Tuesday

This surveillance video image released by the Yakima Police Department shows a suspect sought in a shooting at a convenience store in Yakima, Wash., early on Tuesday. Yakima Police Department Facebook hide caption

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Yakima Police Department Facebook

Sunday

Wednesday

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. On Monday, his daughter Bernice King said, "My father's 'dream' wasn't palpable to the white masses, including politicians." AP hide caption

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AP

Friday

Thursday

The Food and Drug Administration announced it has loosened some restrictions on the pill mifepristone, allowing it to be dispensed by more pharmacies and without an in-person exam. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Wednesday

"This dog has never met a stranger in his life," owner Sandra O'Neill said fondly, about the missing dog Zeppelin. "He's a very outgoing, loving dog." Sandra O'Neill hide caption

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Sandra O'Neill

Wednesday

Wednesday

Santonastasso Enterprises, which owns and operates 13 McDonald's franchises in and around Pittsburgh, Pa., paid a civil penalty of $57,332 for violating child labor laws, according to the Department of Labor. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

Tuesday

A thylacine or 'Tasmanian tiger' in captivity, circa 1930. These animals are thought to be extinct, since the last known wild thylacine was shot in 1930 and the last captive one died in 1936. Topical Press Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

Thursday

Starbucks Workers United members hope to win over customers who might not be thrilled with the strike by offering an even more exclusive commemorative item: A union-designed red cup with the Starbucks Workers United logo on the front. Starbucks Workers United hide caption

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Starbucks Workers United

On Red Cup Day, thousands of Starbucks workers go on strike

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Tuesday

Monday

Saturday

In an experiment conducted by researchers at Queen Mary University of London, bees could make their way through an unobstructed path to a feeding area or opt for a detour into a chamber with wooden balls (toys). Many took the detour. Odd Andersen/Associated Press hide caption

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Odd Andersen/Associated Press