Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
Stories By

Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

Story Archive

Starbucks Workers United members hope to win over customers who might not be thrilled with the strike by offering an even more exclusive commemorative item: A union-designed red cup with the Starbucks Workers United logo on the front. Starbucks Workers United hide caption

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Starbucks Workers United

On Red Cup Day, thousands of Starbucks workers go on strike

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In an experiment conducted by researchers at Queen Mary University of London, bees could make their way through an unobstructed path to a feeding area or opt for a detour into a chamber with wooden balls (toys). Many took the detour. Odd Andersen/Associated Press hide caption

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Odd Andersen/Associated Press

Scientists at the site in Tulsa, Okla., will begin excavating by hand, using finer grain tools to clean up the coffins. That will help researchers analyze the construction style and hardware of the caskets in order to determine when they were interred. City of Tulsa hide caption

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City of Tulsa

Health experts agree that the unseasonably early surges of RSV cases, especially among children, are a consequence of lifting COVID-19 precautions, which served to protect the public from a variety of viruses. AP hide caption

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AP

The Barilla pasta company is being sued in a California court for allegedly misleading U.S. consumers with false advertising that its U.S.-sold pastas are made in Italy. Edoardo Fornaciari/Getty Images for Barilla hide caption

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Edoardo Fornaciari/Getty Images for Barilla

Los Angeles City Council members Gil Cedillo (left) and Kevin de León have refused calls to resign for their participation in a racist and demeaning conversation. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

A look at the salaries of 2 LA City Council members involved in racist conversation

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Models of a protein from the respiratory syncytial virus are shown at The University of Texas at Austin on March 31, 2022. A spike in RSV cases among children is pushing some hospitals to capacity. The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post via Getty Images

A new audit of autopsies conducted under David Fowler's tenue "will determine whether independent experts agree or disagree with the [the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner's] determination of cause and manner of death, whether such experts believe the OCME's determinations were based on adequate investigations," the panel's said. AP hide caption

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AP

The teen artist, who is a sophomore at Grant High School in Grant, Mich., attempted to allay parent's fears about her work and her intentions. "I put my artwork up there to make people feel welcomed," she said in a quivering voice. 13 On Your Side, an ABC affiliate station hide caption

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13 On Your Side, an ABC affiliate station

The petition calling for the return of the ancient Egyptian works states, "The presence of these artefacts in the British Museum to this day supports past colonial endeavors of cultural violence and deprives Egypt as the country of origin of not only the physical return of these objects, but also of their important role as Egyptian cultural heritage that spans a millennia of rich history." Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

LAX officials told NPR that FlyLAX.com was partially disrupted early Monday morning. The service interruption did not compromise internal airport systems and there were no operational disruptions, according to authorities. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Los Angeles Police Department officers carry the casket of LAPD Officer Houston R. Tipping at the beginning of his memorial service on Wednesday, June 22, in Los Angeles. Carolyn Cole/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/AP