Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

Lee Boyd Malvo, the 'D.C. Sniper.' The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to dismiss a pending case after the state changed a criminal sentencing law for juveniles. Virginia Department of Corrections /AP hide caption

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Virginia Department of Corrections /AP

Attorney Cristobal Galindo, center, is accompanied by Jesus Hernandez, left, and Maria Guereca, and attorney Marion Reilly in front of the Supreme Court, in Nov. 2019. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Los Angeles District Attorney Jackie Lacey announced she has asked a judge to wipe out and seal cannabis-related convictions dating back to 1956. It's the culmination of a partnership with the nonprofit group Code for America which used computer-based algorithms to identify eligible cases. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Kody Brown, pictured in Feb. 2017, protested Utah's felony laws against polygamy. Brown and his three wives star in the TV show Sister Wives. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

A six-part documentary called Who Killed Malcom X? includes new information regarding the investigation into the assassination of the iconic black Muslim leader. AP hide caption

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AP

The head and skin of an East African lion killed at the turn of the century by President Theodore Roosevelt decorates The Explorers Club in New York. A committee designed to advise the Department of Interior on the benefits of big-game hunting was dissolved in December after two years. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Salvadoran deportees, pictured in June 2018, listen to instructions from an immigration officer at La Chacra Immigration Center in San Salvador, El Salvador. A Human Rights Watch Report found that 138 repatriated Salvadorans have been killed since 2013. More than 70 others were beaten, sexually assaulted, extorted, tortured or went missing. Salvador Melendez/AP hide caption

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Salvador Melendez/AP

Lesotho first lady Maesaiah Thabane was reportedly charged with murder on Tuesday for alleged links to the brutal 2017 killing of the prime minister's first wife. Michele Spatari /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Spatari /AFP via Getty Images

Fire officials say fuel apparently dumped by the aircraft returning to LAX fell onto several school campuses in southeast Los Angeles. Matt Hartman/AP hide caption

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Matt Hartman/AP

'I Don't Believe This Is Happening': 911 Call Reveals Chaos After Delta Fuel Dump

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Gwen Ifill, one of the nation's most esteemed journalists, will be the face of the U.S. Post Office 43rd stamp in the Black Heritage series. USPS via AP hide caption

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USPS via AP

Journalist Gwen Ifill Honored With Black Heritage Forever Stamp

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Actress Annabella Sciorra described in detail the alleged assault by Harvey Weinstein during his trial on Thursday. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Actress Annabella Sciorra Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Raped Her

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