Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
Stories By

Vanessa Romo

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Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

A protester is shown being taken into custody by federal officers in Portland, Ore., last month. "We recognize that we undermine public safety, not promote it, if we leverage the force of our criminal justice system against peaceful protesters who are demanding to be heard," Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said on Tuesday. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Gov. Gavin Newsom, pictured in April, warns President Trump's executive action on unemployment benefits would lead to painful cuts across the state's budget. Rich Pedroncelli/AP/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Racial Justice Protests In Portland Enter Their 3rd Month

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Chad Wolf, acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, addresses a news conference Tuesday in Washington, D.C., on the situation in Portland, Ore. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The COVID Racial Data Tracker, a joint project of the Antiracist Research & Policy Center and the COVID Tracking Project, reported in May that Black people are dying at 2.5 times the rate of white people. They also account for 23% of COVID-19 deaths where race is known. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Mark and Patricia McCloskey of St. Louis who brandished firearms outside their home were charged on Monday with unlawful use of a weapon, a class E felony. Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Crime scene tape surrounds the home of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas on Monday in North Brunswick, N.J. A gunman posing as a delivery person shot and killed Salas' 20-year-old son and wounded her husband on Sunday evening at their home before fleeing, according to officials. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

A group of white people surround Vauhxx Booker, center, as he is bent over leaning against a tree, at Monroe Lake near Bloomington, Ind., on July 4. Brennan Golightly/AP hide caption

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Brennan Golightly/AP

"With the recent spike in COVID-19 infections, we're joining others in taking the next step and requiring all customers to wear face coverings when entering any of our stores throughout the country effective Monday, July 20," CVS officials said Thursday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is taking Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and the City Council to court to block the city's mask-wearing mandate. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

The City Council unanimously approved a resolution apologizing for the local government's historic role in slavery and for participating in racist and discriminatory policies that have led to oppression. Walter Bibikow/Getty Images hide caption

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Walter Bibikow/Getty Images

Sunset near a protest camp outside of the Lakota Sioux reservation of Standing Rock, North Dakota, in December 2016. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Harvey Weinstein arrives at a Manhattan court on Feb. 21, 2020, during jury deliberations in his rape trial in New York. Weinstein was found guilty and is serving a 23-year sentence for sexually assaulting one woman and raping another. He is appealing the verdict while also facing rape and sexual assault charges in Los Angeles. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP