Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

In this photo provided by Eli Lilly, a researcher tests possible COVID-19 antibodies in a laboratory in Indianapolis, Ind. On Monday, U.S. government officials announced they are putting an early end to a study testing an Eli Lilly antibody drug for people hospitalized with COVID-19 because it is unlikely to help. David Morrison/AP hide caption

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David Morrison/AP

A firefighter battles the Silverado Fire Monday,in Irvine, Calif. The wildfire forced evacuation orders for 60,000 people in Southern California. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Maki, the 21-year-old male ring-tailed lemur was discovered missing shortly before the zoo opened to visitors, zoo and police officials said. They're seeking tips from the public in hopes of finding the lemur, explaining that Maki is an endangered animal that requires specialized care. Marianne V. Hale/AP hide caption

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Marianne V. Hale/AP

The phase 3 trial of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been paused as the company investigates what it says is a study participant's "unexplained illness." Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP

The agony of George Floyd's final moments on Memorial Day, pinned below the knee of then-officer Derek Chauvin, ignited a national wave of protests against police brutality and racial injustice that are still ongoing. Brommerich/AP hide caption

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Brommerich/AP

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel, pictured in March 2019, told NPR the threat posed by individuals subscribing to extremist ideology is a nationwide problem. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

"The government chooses to persecute us for doing no more than exercising our right to defend ourselves, our home, our property and our family," said Mark McCloskey, alongside his wife Patricia on Tuesday outside the Carnahan Courthouse. Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, pictured on Sept. 23, did not pursue charges related to the killing of Breonna Taylor. Her family lawyers say that indicates bias. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Clare Bronfman, the Seagram's liquor fortune heir, was sentenced to 81 months in prison for her role in protecting Keith Raniere, the disgraced leader of Nxivm who was convicted of turning women into sex slaves. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Bombing victim Sarah Collins Rudolph, pictured in 2013, argues that Ku Klux Klan members who attacked the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963 were "inspired and motivated by then-Gov. [George] Wallace's racist rhetoric." Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

A Kentucky grand jury on Wednesday indicted former Louisville Police Department detective Brett Hanksion for shooting into neighboring apartments. On Monday he pleaded not guilty. Louisville Metro Police Department via AP hide caption

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Louisville Metro Police Department via AP

Williamson County Sheriff Robert Chody was booked on Monday on a $10,000 bond. A grand jury indicted the Texas sheriff on charges of destroying or concealing video in an investigation into the death of Javier Ambler, a Black man who died in police custody last year. Williamson County Sheriff via AP hide caption

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Williamson County Sheriff via AP