Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

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Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

Details about the forthcoming assistance for earthquake victims remain vague but a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency told NPR the funds will be released "on an ongoing basis." Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

From left, then-Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, President Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participate in a USMCA signing ceremony in November 2018 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora, pictured in December 2019, announced he is leaving the team in the wake of a Major League Baseball investigation that said he helped develop a sign-stealing system. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

In this image from video, a Delta plane dumps fuel over Los Angeles before returning for an emergency landing on Tuesday. Fire officials say fuel fell onto an elementary school playground. Matt Hartman/AP hide caption

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Matt Hartman/AP

Grounded Boeing 737 Max airplanes crowd a parking area in Seattle in June. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Boeing Employees Mocked FAA In Internal Messages Before 737 Max Disasters

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Prosecutors said in court documents on Thursday that Metropolitan Correctional Center officials "mistakenly" preserved the wrong surveillance footage. New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP hide caption

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New York State Sex Offender Registry via AP

Overall, researchers found men died of alcohol-related causes in 2017 at a higher rate than women. But when analyzing annual increases in deaths, the largest increase was among white women. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

The U.S. Army is trying to calm fears of a new draft, after recruiting offices across the country received panicked phone calls from people saying they or their children had been conscripted. Mike Knaak/AP hide caption

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Mike Knaak/AP

U.S. Army soldiers from 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Task Force-Iraq man a defensive position at Forward Operating Base Union III in Baghdad last month. Task Force-Iraq Public Affairs via Reuters hide caption

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Task Force-Iraq Public Affairs via Reuters

Harvey Weinstein leaves a New York court on Monday, where jury selection has begun. Meanwhile, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office says the movie mogul faces allegations that he sexually assaulted two women in 2013. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn, pictured leaving the Tokyo Detention Center in April, is believed to have escaped with the help of several individuals. So far, Turkish authorities have arrested 12 people in connection with the auto executive's getaway. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP