Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

Clare Bronfman, the Seagram's liquor fortune heir, was sentenced to 81 months in prison for her role in protecting Keith Raniere, the disgraced leader of Nxivm who was convicted of turning women into sex slaves. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Bombing victim Sarah Collins Rudolph, pictured in 2013, argues that Ku Klux Klan members who attacked the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963 were "inspired and motivated by then-Gov. [George] Wallace's racist rhetoric." Dave Martin/AP hide caption

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Dave Martin/AP

A Kentucky grand jury on Wednesday indicted former Louisville Police Department detective Brett Hanksion for shooting into neighboring apartments. On Monday he pleaded not guilty. Louisville Metro Police Department via AP hide caption

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Louisville Metro Police Department via AP

Williamson County Sheriff Robert Chody was booked on Monday on a $10,000 bond. A grand jury indicted the Texas sheriff on charges of destroying or concealing video in an investigation into the death of Javier Ambler, a Black man who died in police custody last year. Williamson County Sheriff via AP hide caption

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Williamson County Sheriff via AP

A protester stands in Jefferson Square on Thursday in Louisville, Ky., where hundreds have been holding demonstrations in the aftermath of the grand jury's decision not to charge officers for her death. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Police and protesters converge during a demonstration, Wednesday in Louisville, Ky. A grand jury has indicted one officer on criminal charges six months after Breonna Taylor was fatally shot by police in Kentucky. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

People react Wednesday after the grand jury's decision in the March shooting death of Breonna Taylor by police in her home in Louisville, Ky. Carlos Barria/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signs Assembly Bill 2147 after he toured the North Complex Fire zone on Friday. The bill allows inmates who have worked as firefighters to ask the court to dismiss their charges to make it easier for them to find a job once they are released. People convicted of certain violent or sex crimes would not be eligible. Paul Kitagaki Jr./AP hide caption

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Paul Kitagaki Jr./AP

Armed homeowners Mark and Patricia McCloskey confront protesters marching to St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson's house on June 28. The St. Louis Metropolitan Police has issued citations for trespassing to nine protesters, and these are under review by the city counselor's office. Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

A boy lights a candle commemorating Aaron 'Jay' Danielson on Saturday night. Danielson, 39, was a member of Patriot Prayer. He was killed during a Portland protest on Aug. 29. Vanessa Romo/NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Romo/NPR

A memorial in Rochester, N.Y., where Daniel Prude, a 41-year-old Black man, died while in police custody this past March. In New York City, hundreds of Black Lives Matter demonstrators took to the city's streets in protest. Adrian Kraus/AP hide caption

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Adrian Kraus/AP