Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

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Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

Philonise Floyd (left) and attorney Ben Crump react after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of Floyd's brother George Floyd Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, here in September, praised the witnesses and jurors in the Derek Chauvin trial on Tuesday. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

People gather outside the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis on Tuesday before the jury's decision returning guilty verdicts against former police officer Derek Chauvin. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Former Vice President Walter Mondale and former President Jimmy Carter appeared together in 2018, marking Mondale's 90th birthday. Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Star Tribune via Getty Images

Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies At 93

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The U.S. Department of State will add a slew of countries to its "Do Not Travel List" later this week because of coronavirus danger. Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

Prosecutor Jerry Blackwell gives the state's rebuttal Monday during closing arguments to the jury in the trial of Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Two boys hold signs at an April 6 news conference, days after a Chicago police officer fatally shot 13-year-old Adam Toledo. Shafkat Anowar/AP hide caption

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Shafkat Anowar/AP

Dr. David Fowler testifies Wednesday in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin is on trial for charges of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

A Coast Guard Station Grand Isle boat crew heads toward a capsized commercial lift boat on Tuesday, searching for people in the water 8 miles south of Grand Isle, La. U.S. Coast Guard District 8 hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard District 8

Barry Brodd, a use-of-force expert, testifies Tuesday in former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's trial. Brodd said the position in which George Floyd was restrained — facedown on the ground — was safest for officers and the suspect. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP
Molly Magnell for NPR

'Comfort Decorating' Is All About Making Your Home A Sanctuary

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Witness Seth Stoughton testified on Monday in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin that the force used against George Floyd was not reasonable. Court TV via AP hide caption

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Court TV via AP