Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

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Story Archive

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin appears at a Senate hearing earlier this month. On Tuesday, he said he will support long-debated changes to the military justice system that would remove decisions on prosecuting sexual assault cases from military commanders. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Defense Secretary Will Back A Seismic Shift In Prosecuting Military Sex Assault Cases

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Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib said on Monday that he would not have been able to publicly come out as gay without the support of the NFL and his teammates. Jeff Bottari/AP hide caption

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Jeff Bottari/AP

Patricia McCloskey and her husband Mark McCloskey pleaded guilty to misdemeanor crimes on Thursday. They also agreed to forfeit both weapons they used when they confronted protesters in front of their home in June of last year. Jim Salter/AP hide caption

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Jim Salter/AP

Opal Lee, shown earlier this month, is celebrating this week's passage of legislation making Juneteenth a federal holiday. President Biden signed the bill Thursday. Amanda McCoy/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda McCoy/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

When relaying why she chose the farm fields for her college graduation photo shoot, Jennifer Rocha explained it's because that's where her parents "sacrificed their backs, their sweat, their early mornings, late afternoons, working cold winters, hot summers just to give me and my sisters an education." Branden Rodriguez/Instagram @branden.shoots hide caption

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Branden Rodriguez/Instagram @branden.shoots

Black-legged ticks carrying the bacterium that causes Lyme have been found in the coastal chaparrals surrounding California beaches. James Gathany/CDC via AP hide caption

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James Gathany/CDC via AP

Court documents state that Emma Coronel Aispuro (center) controlled a vast fortune earned from the sale of multi-ton cocaine, heroin and marijuana shipments. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

The International Olympic Committee plans to implement strict virus-prevention measures that include segregation of athletes from the general population and a ban on overseas fans. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

The Justice Department has assembled a new task force to confront ransomware after what officials say was the most costly year on record for the crippling cyberattacks. It managed to recover $2.3 million of the ransom paid by Colonial Pipeline in an attack earlier this year, the department announced Monday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks on after a special session of the Knesset, Israel's parliament, elected a new state president on Wednesday. Ronen Zvulun/AP hide caption

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Ronen Zvulun/AP

"What we want to do is make sure that our fantastic tourist industry, including the cruise ships, including our hospitality in our ancillary businesses, have an opportunity to get back to where they were," Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy says. Becky Bohrer/AP hide caption

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Becky Bohrer/AP

A weekend ransomware attack on the world's largest meat company disrupted production around the world just weeks after a similar incident shut down a U.S. oil pipeline. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP