Vanessa Romo Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk.
Vanessa Romo
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Vanessa Romo

Kara Frame/NPR
Vanessa Romo
Kara Frame/NPR

Vanessa Romo

Reporter

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

Story Archive

European carriers are urging the European Union to alter so-called "use it or lose it" regulations forcing airlines to continue flying empty or near-empty flights. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

"By bringing archaeological perspectives to an active space domain, we're the first to show how people adapt their behavior to a completely new environment," Associate Professor Justin Walsh of Chapman University said of the experiment. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Three Sharon Hill police officers have been charged with manslaughter and reckless endangerment after firing their weapons into a crowd of people leaving a high school football game outside of Philadelphia, killing Fanta Bility and injuring three people. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Teacher burnout and thinning substitute teacher rolls combined with the continuing fallout of the winter surge is pushing public school leaders to the brink of desperation. Lawmakers are responding by temporarily rewriting hiring rules. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

A 2016 Harvard Business School study, specifically looking at behavioral patterns on Airbnb, found that guests with "distinctly African-American names are roughly 16% less likely to be accepted than identical guests with distinctively White names." Lionel Bonaventure /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure /AFP via Getty Images

"Congressional offices, Committees, and Agencies should immediately review their operations to adopt a maximal telework posture to reduce in-person meetings and in-office activities to the maximum extent possible," attending physician Brain Monahan said on Monday. Pablo Porciuncula /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Porciuncula /AFP via Getty Images

Tesla reported 475,318 vehicles — 356,309 Model 3 and 119,009 Model S — are subject to the recalls, according to documents filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell is seated at the defense table while watching testimony of witnesses during her trial in New York. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Ghislaine Maxwell found guilty of helping Jeffrey Epstein sexually abuse girls

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A health care worker administers a COVID-19 PCR test at a free test site in Farragut Square on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the CDC revised data reflecting the prevalence of the omicron variant in new COVID-19 cases. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

People wait in long lines in Times Square to get tested for COVID-19 on Monday. New York City, which was initially overwhelmed by the pandemic, has once again seen case numbers surge as the new omicron variant becomes dominant. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In this screen grab from police body camera footage shown in court in the trial of Kim Potter, the Brooklyn Center, Minn., police officer reacts after the April 11 traffic stop in which Daunte Wright was fatally shot. AP hide caption

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AP