John Murph John Murph writes about music and culture and works as a web producer for BETJazz.com. He also contributes regularly to The Washington Post Express, JazzTimes, Down Beat, and JazzWise magazines.
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John Murph

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Sonnymoon. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Sonnymoon

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Scott Tixier's "Elephant Rose" taps into modern-day nostalgia and still brings about something fresh. Chris Drukker hide caption

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Chris Drukker

Underneath the firepower in Alfredo Rodriguez's "Fog" lies the work of a remarkable composer. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Fog

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Kenny Garrett's "Welcome Earth Song" conjures the spirit of Pharoah Sanders — and a soul-stirring church service. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Welcome Earth Song

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Drummer Johnathan Blake tackles Robert Glasper's "Canvas," and in the process gives it a renewed sheen. Emra Islek hide caption

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Emra Islek

Canvas

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Jazz singer Theo Bleckmann tackles Bush's classic "Love and Anger" with a sharp mind and a soulful heart. /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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/Courtesy of the artist

Love and Anger

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Vijay Iyer and his trio masterfully articulate a complex composition's exuberant, zigzagging melody. Jimmy Katz hide caption

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Jimmy Katz

Accelerando

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The Revelations' "Something's Got to Give" captures real-life desperation, for desperate real-life times. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Concrete Blues

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Carolina Chocolate Drops' "Country Girl" is a 21st-century musical portrait of black America's Southern comfort. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Leaving Eden

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Enrico Rava's "Cornettology" slyly alludes to several of Ornette Coleman's compositions without quoting them outright. Roberto Masotti hide caption

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Roberto Masotti

Tati

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Paired with Madlib's soulful evocation of sunlight piercing through clouds, M.E.D.'s "Mystical Magic" is a distinctive slice of hip-hop. Eric Coleman hide caption

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Eric Coleman

Classic

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Bypassing vocal histrionics, Zara McFarlane takes a suspenseful route in "More Than Mine (Alternate Take)." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Until Tomorrow

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In a cover of Sly Stone's "Family Affair," Steven Bernstein's gripping arrangement deftly underscores Antony Hegarty's haunting croon. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Family Affair

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Chicago-bred jazz crooner Sachal Vasandani examines the horror of Japan's recent tsunami by studying it from eye level. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Hi-Fly

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Alan Hampton's bittersweet "Change Your Mind" could be reconfigured into a hit in just about any genre. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'Change Your Mind' by Alan Hampton

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