Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi is a host and reporter for Planet Money.
Alexi Horowitz, photographed for NPR, 2 August 2022, in New York, NY. Photo by Mamadi Doumbouya for NPR.
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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

Mamadi Doumbouya/NPR
Alexi Horowitz, photographed for NPR, 2 August 2022, in New York, NY. Photo by Mamadi Doumbouya for NPR.
Mamadi Doumbouya/NPR

Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

Host and Reporter, Planet Money

Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi is a host and reporter for Planet Money, telling stories that creatively explore and explain the workings of the global economy. He's a sucker for a good supply chain mystery — from toilet paper to foster puppies to specialty pastas. He's drawn to tales of unintended consequences, like the time a well-intentioned chemistry professor unwittingly helped unleash a global market for synthetic drugs, or what happened when the U.S. Patent Office started granting patents on human genes. And he's always on the lookout for economic principles at work in unexpected places, like the tactics comedians use to protect their intellectual property (a.k.a. jokes).

He's reported from Iceland on the dramatic crash of the country's budget airline, from Denmark on the global trade for human sperm, and from Germany on the country's (uncannily familiar) obsession with returning the things they buy online. He also produced Planet Money's 2020 Murrow-award-winning collaboration with the NPR Ed Desk, the show's audiobook rendition of the Great Gatsby, as well as collaborative episodes with Pro Publica, and Gimlet Media's How to Save A Planet.

Horowitz-Ghazi hails from Santa Fe, New Mexico, studied history at Reed College, and got his start in radio at Oregon Public Broadcasting. He was selected as a 2014 AIR New Voices Scholar and a 2019 Arthur F. Burns Fellow. He previously worked with Michel Martin's team at All Things Considered, where he produced breaking news and feature stories, led film coverage, and directed the live broadcast.

At All Things Considered, Horowitz-Ghazi reported on how a national clown scare affected professional clowns, who was behind of a wave of succulent poaching on the California coastline, what happens to a musician's legacy after they die, and why his hometown burns a giant human effigy every year. He also pitched and produced "Brave New Workers," a series of profiles on people adapting to the changing economy, and has interviewed coal miners, rock climbers, coyote hunters, porn stars, cowboys, truck drivers, drone pilots, Carrie Brownstein, Werner Herzog, and George R.R. Martin, among many others. In his free time, he enjoys riding bicycles, playing squash (middlingly), and sleeping out of doors.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Friday

Jack Corbett/NPR

Econ Battle Zone: Disinflation Confrontation

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Friday

Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

Chasing the American Dream at Outback Steakhouse (Classic)

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Tuesday

Resellers pick through stores' bargain bins in search of items to flip for profit

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Friday

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Friday

Friday

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Actors back. Pandas gone. WeBankrupt.

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Wednesday

Left: Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi helped author Brian Merchant commune with the Luddites by smashing machines. Right: Economist Kevin Lang visited an 1830s historical village to ride in a horse-drawn trolley. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

Friday

As head of the FTC, Lina Khan is bringing a case against Amazon that echoes her law school paper on the tech company's monopoly power. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

Wednesday

LEFT: Ida Tarbell, photographed between 1905 and 1945. RIGHT: Robert Bork in 1987. Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division/Associated Press hide caption

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Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division/Associated Press

Antitrust in America, from Standard Oil to Bork (classic)

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Friday

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA - OCTOBER 14: In this image released on October 14, Bad Bunny performs onstage at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards, broadcast on October 14, 2020 at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, CA. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images) Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Tuesday

Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

Chasing the American Dream at Outback Steakhouse

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Thursday

How the Game Stop short squeeze movie got made

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Wednesday

"Based on a true story"

When a group of amateur investors rallied around the stock for GameStop back in 2021, the story blew up the internet. News outlets around the world, including us here at Planet Money, rushed in to explain why the stock for this retail video game company was suddenly skyrocketing, at times by as much as 1700% in value, and what that meant for the rest of us.

"Based on a true story"

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Friday

Agung Parameswara/Getty Images

Friday

LEFT: Bill Wolkoff is a strike captain for the Writers Guild of America, coordinating the picket at the Television City lot. Prior to the strike, Wolkoff wrote for Star Trek: Strange New Worlds. RIGHT: Sara Bibel is a writer picketing at Television City. She spent 13 years working at The Young and the Restless. Dave Blanchard/NPR hide caption

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Dave Blanchard/NPR

The secret entrance that sidesteps Hollywood picket lines

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Sunday

'Past Lives' is inspired by filmmaker Celine Song's own experience with a childhood friend

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Wednesday

A time ball on a rooftop in Boston, Massachusetts in 1881. Winslow Upton and William Babcock Hazen/United States War Department, Washington D.C. 1881 hide caption

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Winslow Upton and William Babcock Hazen/United States War Department, Washington D.C. 1881

The Day of Two Noons (Classic)

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Friday

Evelynn and Cinnamon stand in the goat pen behind Melissa Schrock's house, which is at the heart of the property dispute. Keith Romer/Keith Romer hide caption

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Keith Romer/Keith Romer

How to fight a squatting goat

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Friday

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Gloomy global growth, Tupperware troubles, RIP HBO Max

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Wednesday

Illustration by Rosaura Rodriguez, Color by Omar Banuchi/WNYC

The battle for Puerto Rico's beaches

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Friday

Dozens of TV shows are disappearing from streaming platforms like HBO Max. Here's why

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Friday

Casey Bloys, President of Programming of HBO, speaks onstage at HBO Max WarnerMedia Investor Day Presentation at Warner Bros. Studios on October 29, 2019 in Burbank, California. Presley Ann/Getty Images for WarnerMedia hide caption

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Presley Ann/Getty Images for WarnerMedia

Why platforms like HBO Max are removing streaming TV shows

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Wednesday

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