Jane Arraf Jane Arraf is NPR's International Correspondent based in Cairo.
Jane Arraf
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Jane Arraf

Jane Arraf

International Correspondent, Cairo, Egypt

Jane Arraf covers Egypt, Iraq, and other parts of the Middle East for NPR News.

Arraf joined NPR in 2017 after two decades of reporting from and about the region for CNN, NBC, the Christian Science Monitor, PBS Newshour, and Al Jazeera English. She has previously been posted to Baghdad, Amman, and Istanbul, along with Washington, DC, New York, and Montreal.

She has reported from Iraq since the 1990s. For several years, Arraf was the only Western journalist based in Baghdad. She reported on the war in Iraq in 2003 and covered live the battles for Fallujah, Najaf, Samarra, and Tel Afar. She has also covered India, Pakistan, Haiti, Bosnia, and Afghanistan and has done extensive magazine writing.

Arraf is a former Edward R. Murrow press fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Her awards include a Peabody for PBS NewsHour, an Overseas Press Club citation, and inclusion in a CNN Emmy.

Arraf studied journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa and began her career at Reuters.

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Story Archive

Kamo Zandinan says goodbye in the Mosul orphanage to a 10-year-old girl she believes is her daughter Sonya, taken from her by ISIS six years ago. The girl was rescued by police in March from an Arab family to whom she was not related. Zandinan is waiting for DNA tests to confirm whether the girl is her daughter. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

A Yazidi Woman Searches For Her Lost Daughter, Kidnapped By ISIS 6 Years Ago

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Gasser Abdel Razek, executive director of Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, in a photo from the organization's website. Abdel Razek was arrested with two other officials of the civil rights organization after the met with European ambassadors. Courtesy Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights hide caption

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Courtesy Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights

Her Daughter Was Taken By ISIS 6 Years Ago. Now She May Have Found Her

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Samah Ibrahim Tanieub at home with her sons, Eyan, 5, and Rayan, 7 (left). Taniub is a divorced single mother working in the isolation ward of Amman's main COVID hospital. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Inside The World Of A Jordanian Nurse Doing Essential Work In The Pandemic

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What Might Biden's Presidency Mean For U.S. Foreign Policy?

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Khaled Jamal Abdullah after running away from home to pledge allegiance to ISIS and join the militant group as a fighter. He had just turned 16. Jamal Abdullah Naser hide caption

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Jamal Abdullah Naser

Iraqi Family Identifies Their Son As ISIS Teen At Center Of Navy War Crimes Trial

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Christian Refugees From Iraq On Their New Lives In Jordan

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Tension Is Rising In Iraq Over An Alleged U.S. Threat To Close Its Embassy

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Kuwait state television announced Tuesday that the country's ruler, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah, pictured last year at the 40th Gulf Cooperation Council Summit in Saudi Arabia, has died. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

Syrian refugee Mohammad al-Saleh near Amman. He and his wife are farm laborers and were working in the fields when their tent caught fire in June, killing their four youngest children. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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'No Hope': A Deadly Tent Fire In Jordan Leaves Syrian Refugee Farmworkers In Despair

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Iraqi National Museum Deputy Director Musin Hassan holds his head in his hands as he sits amid destroyed artifacts in the Baghdad museum in 2003. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi To Meet With Trump

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Iraq's Prime Minister To Visit White House

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COVID-19 Lockdown At Refugee Camp In Jordan Is Tough On Young Syrians

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