Jane Arraf Jane Arraf is NPR's International Correspondent based in Cairo.
Jane Arraf
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Jane Arraf

Jane Arraf

International Correspondent, Cairo, Egypt

Jane Arraf covers Egypt, Iraq, and other parts of the Middle East for NPR News.

Arraf joined NPR in 2017 after two decades of reporting from and about the region for CNN, NBC, the Christian Science Monitor, PBS Newshour, and Al Jazeera English. She has previously been posted to Baghdad, Amman, and Istanbul, along with Washington, DC, New York, and Montreal.

She has reported from Iraq since the 1990s. For several years, Arraf was the only Western journalist based in Baghdad. She reported on the war in Iraq in 2003 and covered live the battles for Fallujah, Najaf, Samarra, and Tel Afar. She has also covered India, Pakistan, Haiti, Bosnia, and Afghanistan and has done extensive magazine writing.

Arraf is a former Edward R. Murrow press fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Her awards include a Peabody for PBS NewsHour, an Overseas Press Club citation, and inclusion in a CNN Emmy.

Arraf studied journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa and began her career at Reuters.

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Story Archive

Bedouin Tour Guide Loses His House After Jordan Closes Borders During The Pandemic

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Hobby Lobby bought the Gilgamesh Dream Tablet for more than $1.6 million in 2014. "This rare tablet was pillaged from Iraq and years later sold at a major auction house, with a questionable and unsupported provenance," Peter C. Fitzhugh, special agent in charge for Homeland Security Investigations in New York, said in a statement. Immigration and Customs Enforcement hide caption

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Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Mustafa al-Kadhimi speaks to Parliament in Baghdad on Thursday. Iraq's former spy chief was sworn in early Thursday as prime minister after weeks of tense political negotiations as the country faces a severe economic crisis spurred by the coronavirus pandemic. Iraqi Parliament Media Office/AP hide caption

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Iraqi Parliament Media Office/AP

Iraqi Parliament Chooses Mustafa Al-Kadhimi To Be Prime Minister

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Tour guide Mohammad Awwad by the Treasury in Petra, Jordan's biggest tourist destination. Moises Saman for NPR hide caption

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Moises Saman for NPR

'1st Time To See It Like This': Petra Tourism Workers Long For Visitors To Return

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A pop-up bakery in the town of Shoubak, Jordan, offers traditional Ramadan dessert known as qatayef a day before the start of the holy month. Moises Saman for NPR hide caption

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Moises Saman for NPR

Muslims Mark Ramadan During Coronavirus Pandemic

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Jordan Takes Early And Intense Action To Slow The Coronavirus

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On April 3, Iraqi volunteers in full hazmat gear prayed over the coffin of a 50-year-old who died of COVID-19. She was buried at a cemetery specifically opened for such deaths, some 12 miles from the holy city of Najaf. Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdani/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Is Changing The Rituals Of Death For Many Religions

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Global Roundtable: Coronavirus Crisis Upends Death Rituals

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The streets of Jordan's capital of Amman are seen empty after the start of a nationwide curfew on Saturday amid concerns over the coronavirus pandemic. Raad Adayleh/AP hide caption

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Raad Adayleh/AP

Jordan Keeps Coronavirus In Check With One Of The World's Strictest Lockdowns

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