Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is a senior producer for NPR's All Things Considered.
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Andrea Hsu

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Andrea Hsu
Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Senior Producer, All Things Considered

Andrea Hsu is a senior producer for NPR's All Things Considered.

Hsu first joined NPR and All Things Considered in 2002. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. Andrea came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

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Jason Carney designed and installed the solar array on the roof of his house in Nashville, Tenn. He wants to introduce more people in minority communities to the advantages of solar energy. Tamara Reynolds for NPR hide caption

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Tamara Reynolds for NPR

Stepping Into The Sun: A Mission To Bring Solar Energy To Communities Of Color

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An aerial view of the 52-megawatt solar farm built by Silicon Ranch in Hazlehurst, Ga. Ever cheaper and better solar technology, available land and lots of sunshine are driving demand for massive, utility-scale solar projects across the American Southeast. Silicon Ranch hide caption

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Silicon Ranch

How Georgia Became A Surprising Bright Spot In The U.S. Solar Industry

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The Evolution Of Boeing's 737 Jetliner

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A view inside Rhode Island's John J. Moran Medium Security Prison, in Cranston. Rhode Island is the only state to screen every individual who comes into the correctional system for opioid use disorder, and to offer, in conjunction with with counseling, all three medically effective treatments. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Rhode Island Prisons Push To Get Inmates The Best Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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A patient is evacuated from Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas in Beaumont, Texas, on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Texas Expedites Help From Out-Of-State Health Care Providers

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The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center had 528 patients in the hospital as Harvey hit. A team of about 1,000 people tended to them and their families until reinforcements arrived Monday. Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center hide caption

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Courtesy of MD Anderson Cancer Center

An 'Army Of People' Helps Houston Cancer Patients Get Treatment

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Parts of Houston remain flooded, but most hospitals are up and running, according to Darrell Pile, CEO of the Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council, which manages the catastrophic medical operations center in Houston. Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times/Getty Images

In Houston, Most Hospitals 'Up And Fully Functional'

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William Scott (right) and his wife, Teresa, arrived at DaVita Med Center Dialysis in Houston on Tuesday morning, after missing William's appointment on Monday. "It's just good he got in here," she says. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'This Is Surreal': Houston Dialysis Center Struggles To Treat Patients

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Evacuees fill up cots at a shelter set up inside the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Health Issues Stack Up In Houston As Harvey Evacuees Seek Shelter

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After surgeons removed a tumor from Dan Fabbio's brain, they gave him his saxophone — to see whether he'd retained his ability to play. A year after his surgery, Fabbio is back to work full time as a music teacher. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This Music Teacher Played His Saxophone While In Brain Surgery

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Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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After a briefing Tuesday on the opioid crisis, President Trump remarked on its severity but did not offer many specifics on tackling the problem. Two days later, he said his administration would declare a national emergency. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Some States Say Declaring An Emergency Has Helped In The Opioid Fight

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Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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