Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Andrea Hsu

Mike Morgan/NPR
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

Freight rail cars sit in a rail yard in Wilmington, California, on November 22, 2022. This week, President Biden urged Congress to pass legislation to prevent a rail strike that could have brought trains to a halt nationwide. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some rail workers say Biden "turned his back on us" in deal to avert rail strike

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Freight rail union rejects contract, increasing the possibility of a strike

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A Union Pacific freight train carries cargo along a rail line at sunset in Bosler, Wyoming, on August 13, 2022. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Largest rail union rejects contract, stoking fears of a strike

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Freight cars wait to be hauled out of the Norfolk Southern Conway Terminal in Conway, Pa., on Sept. 15. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

As holidays near, a nationwide rail strike is still on the table. Here's the latest

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The country has seen a dramatic shift away from jobs requiring physical strength. Fewer than 1 in 10 jobs now require what's called heavy work, a sector once dominated by men. Jung Getty/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Getty/Getty Images

The Treasury's website kept crashing as investors scrambled to buy government bonds. Andrea Hsu hide caption

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Andrea Hsu

The bond that broke the internet

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Tucker Bubacz, a 17-year-old senior, climbs into the cab of a semi truck just outside Williamsport High School in Williamsport, Md. on Monday, Oct. 17, 2022. Amanda Berg for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Berg for NPR

The driver of the big rig one lane over might soon be one of these teenagers

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Just before turning 55, Dean Hebert retired from his job at the University of Maryland after realizing he had plenty of savings to support himself in retirement. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Early retirement took off during the pandemic. An economic downturn could change that

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Many older workers retired after the pandemic gave them time to rethink priorities

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Marchers raise picket signs during a "Fight Starbucks' Union Busting" rally held in Seattle in April. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Starbucks workers have unionized at record speed; many fear retaliation now

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A look at the tentative deal between freight railroads and rail workers' unions

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President Biden touts tentative labor deal to avert rail strike

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The impact of a potential major railroad shutdown

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