Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Andrea Hsu

Mike Morgan/NPR
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

Georgia Linders got sick with COVID in the spring of 2020 and never recovered. Her ongoing battle with long COVID has prevented her from working. She spends her days advocating for COVID longhaulers like herself and painting, one of the few activities that doesn't wear her out. Georgia Linders hide caption

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Georgia Linders

Millions of Americans have long COVID. Many of them are no longer working

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The struggles COVID long-haulers face at the workplace

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As economy cools, scattered layoffs put an end to dream jobs for some workers

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Scott Lucey, owner of Likewise Coffee whose staff unionized in 2020, sits for a portrait on June 9, 2022 in Milwaukee. Darren Hauck for NPR hide caption

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Darren Hauck for NPR

One unionized. The other did not. How 2 Milwaukee cafés were changed by union drives

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Barista Steph Achter, who led the union campaign at the Milwaukee café now known as Likewise, has worked in different coffee shops for 17 years and wants others to be able to make a career of it as well. Darren Hauck for NPR hide caption

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Darren Hauck for NPR

The barista uprising: Coffee shop workers ignite a union renewal

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Workers at an Amazon warehouse on Staten Island voted in March 2022 to join the Amazon Labor Union. Amazon is presenting its objections to the election before a National Labor Relations Board hearing being conducted over Zoom. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sometimes the threat of unionizing is enough to create change

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Independent coffeehouses become hot spots for unionizing

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Coffee shop baristas across the country are driving a surge in union elections

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The National Labor Relations Board is holding a hearing to consider Amazon's objections to the union election at a warehouse on Staten Island. Amazon is seeking a new election. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Jonathan Pruiett, a geospatial analyst with Cognizant, is part of a team that updates Google maps. They pushed back against a policy that would have required them to be in the office full-time and won a 90-day reprieve. Jonathan Pruiett hide caption

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Jonathan Pruiett

The idea of working in the office, all day, every day? No thanks, say workers

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After 2 years of working from home, many workers aren't ready to return to the office

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After forming a union, negotiating a contract can be an uphill battle

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People hold signs while protesting in front of Starbucks on April 14, 2022 in New York City. Activists gathered to protest Starbucks' CEO Howard Schultz anti-unionization efforts and demand the reinstatement of workers fired for trying to unionize. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Workers walk toward an Amazon warehouse on Staten Island, New York, on April 25, 2022. It's the second Amazon facility on Staten Island to vote on whether to join the Amazon Labor Union. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Amazon Labor Union fails to repeat victory in Staten Island Amazon warehouse election

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