Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Andrea Hsu

Mike Morgan/NPR
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

ESPN reporter Allison Williams reports from a college basketball tournament at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 8, 2017. Williams said in a recent Instagram video that she is leaving ESPN due to the company's vaccine mandate. Lance King/Getty Images hide caption

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Lance King/Getty Images

Workers from a Kellogg cereal plant picket along the main rail lines leading into the facility on Oct. 6 in Omaha, Neb. Workers have gone on strike after a breakdown in contract talks with company management. Grant Schulte/AP hide caption

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Grant Schulte/AP

A two-tier wage system roiled the auto industry. Workers today say no way

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'Striketober' is here, with workers increasingly vocal about what they want

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Margaret Applegate (in yellow scarf), a United Airlines customer service agent, is accompanied by Lori Augustine, vice president of United's San Francisco hub, as Applegate gets a COVID-19 vaccine in September ahead of United's mandated deadline. Sam Almira/United Airlines hide caption

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Sam Almira/United Airlines

Faced with losing their jobs, even the most hesitant are getting vaccinated

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President Biden speaks about his administration's Covid-19 response in Washington, D.C., on July 6, 2021. In September, Biden announced his intention to require vaccines or testing for 80 million workers. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

A big job for small government agency. Enforce vaccine mandate for 80 million workers

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The waiting area of a pop-up vaccination site at St. John The Divine Cathedral sits empty as the rush for vaccinations winds down on June 27, 2021 in New York City. The demand for vaccinations has declined just as the Delta Plus variant of the coronavirus begins to take hold in the United States. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Getting a religious exemption to a vaccine mandate may not be easy. Here's why

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Religious Exemptions To Vaccine Mandates Present A Dilemma For Employers

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Anti-vaccine mandate protesters rally outside the front doors of the Los Angeles Unified School District, LAUSD headquarters in Los Angeles Thursday Sept. 9, 2021. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Nurses Are In Short Supply. Employers Worry Vaccine Mandate Could Make It Worse

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Ahmad Zai Ahmadi began interpreting for U.S. forces in Afghanistan when he was a teenager. Since coming to the U.S. as a recipient of a special immigrant visa, he has mainly relied on gig work to support his family. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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He Was An Interpreter For U.S. Forces In Afghanistan And Now He's Driving For Uber

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The Jobs That Await Afghans In The U.S. Are Often Far Below Their Skill Level

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What Businesses Are Saying About Biden's New Vaccine Mandate

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Biden's Vaccine Rule Covers Two-Thirds Of American Workers

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Biden Took A Tougher Stance Against People Resisting The Vaccine In Speech

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United Airlines has mandated that all U.S. employees be vaccinated against COVID-19 or face termination. Those granted exemptions will be put on leave. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images