Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Andrea Hsu

Mike Morgan/NPR
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

Marchers raise picket signs during a "Fight Starbucks' Union Busting" rally held in Seattle in April. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

A look at the tentative deal between freight railroads and rail workers' unions

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President Biden touts tentative labor deal to avert rail strike

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The impact of a potential major railroad shutdown

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Dockworkers Rebecca Schlarb, Yvette Bjazevic and Jimmy Monti. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

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Philip Cheung for NPR

Before the holiday season, workers at America's busiest ports are fighting the robots

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James "Spinner" Spinosa followed his uncles to the Los Angeles waterfront in 1969. He served in various leadership positions in the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, including as international president. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

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Philip Cheung for NPR

California dockworkers are worried about losing their good-paying jobs to robots

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More than 2 years into the pandemic, COVID-19 continues to roil the labor market

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Organizer Chris Smalls speaks after his Amazon Labor Union won a vote to form the company's first unionized U.S. warehouse in Staten Island, N.Y., in April. Andrea Renault/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrea Renault/AFP via Getty Images

Quiet quitting, real quitting, unionizing — what else are American workers up to?

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Georgia Linders got sick with COVID in the spring of 2020 and never recovered. Her ongoing battle with long COVID has prevented her from working. She spends her days advocating for COVID longhaulers like herself and painting, one of the few activities that doesn't wear her out. Georgia Linders hide caption

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Georgia Linders

Millions of Americans have long COVID. Many of them are no longer working

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The struggles COVID long-haulers face at the workplace

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As economy cools, scattered layoffs put an end to dream jobs for some workers

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Scott Lucey, owner of Likewise Coffee whose staff unionized in 2020, sits for a portrait on June 9, 2022 in Milwaukee. Darren Hauck for NPR hide caption

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One unionized. The other did not. How 2 Milwaukee cafés were changed by union drives

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