Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Andrea Hsu

Mike Morgan/NPR
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

Saturday

The Supreme Court's ruling in favor of Starbucks could impact unions everywhere

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Wednesday

Can the tech industry solve child care problems? Some companies are betting on it

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Monday

On her way to work at the Mazda Toyota Manufacturing plant in northern Alabama, D'Koya Mathis takes her 2-year-old daughter Zharia to Ms. Pat's Child Care & Development Center. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

An auto plant in Alabama is offering employees up to $250 per month for child care

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Thursday

An auto plant in Alabama is offering employees up to $250 per month for child care

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Wednesday

MEETING CHILD CARE NEEDS IN TUSCALOOSA

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Saturday

Friday

More than 5,000 workers assemble luxury SUVs and EV batteries for Mercedes-Benz in Alabama. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Mercedes workers vote no to union. UAW says they were illegally intimidated

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The result of a union election at Mercedes-Benz in Alabama is about to be revealed

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Monday

A giant Mercedes-Benz logo towers over the tree line at the Mercedes-Benz U.S. International plant in Vance, Ala., on June 7, 2017. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Auto workers in Alabama are voting on joining a union. Here's what you need to know

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Wednesday

Noncompete clauses could soon be gone under a new federal ban

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Monday

Over the past several years, Alabama workers have found themselves at the center of three high-profile labor disputes in three industries. Antwon McGhee (left) has worked as a coal miner for 17 years. Isaiah Thomas formerly worked at the Amazon warehouse in Bessemer. Moesha Chandler works in assembly at Mercedes-Benz in Vance. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

How a stretch of I-20 through Alabama tells the story of American workers

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Monday

A drive through Alabama shows how pro-union sentiments are rising in the deep South

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Friday

Union workers at Daimler Truck who make Freightliner and Western Star trucks and Thomas Built buses in North Carolina won significant raises and cost of living allowances. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

Florentino Escobar (second from right) and the six other Starbucks employees known together as the Memphis 7 stand in front of a Memphis, Tenn., mural that honors the 1968 Memphis sanitation workers strike. Amy Holden hide caption

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Amy Holden

What the Starbucks case at the Supreme Court is all about. Hint: It's not coffee

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Friday

Volkswagen workers in Chattanooga, Tenn., celebrate as results from the union election at the auto plant come in on April 19, 2024. The final tally was 2,628 votes in favor of unionizing and 985 against. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Wednesday

Some 4,300 hourly workers at this Volkswagen automobile assembly plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., are voting this week on whether to join the United Auto Workers union. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Why this vote at a Tennessee Volkswagen plant is historic for the South

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Saturday

UAW gets closer to unionizing Volkswagen, Mercedes workers in the South

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Friday

Jeremy Kimbrell has worked at the Mercedes plant in Vance, Ala., since 1999. Having been involved in several failed union drives, he says this latest one feels different. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Seeking to defy history, the UAW is coming closer to unionizing in the South

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Wednesday

Adam Gray/Getty Images

Tuesday

Employees of Goodbody & Co. work at the stock brokerage's headquarters in Manhattan, N.Y., circa 1965. John Pratt/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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John Pratt/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

It's Equal Pay Day. Women earn 84 cents for every dollar men make — or even less

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Tuesday

Dartmouth Big Green gather for a team talk during their game against Columbia Lions in their NCAA men's basketball game on February 16, 2024 in New York City. Adam Gray/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Gray/Getty Images

Dartmouth men's basketball team votes to unionize, shaking up college sports

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A historic election is taking place in Hanover, N.H. — there are 15 eligible voters

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