Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Andrea Hsu

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Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

Tanks of liquid nitrogen are seen at the Foundation Food Group poultry processing plant in Gainesville, Ga. Six workers died after a freezer malfunctioned in January 2021. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

6 Poultry Workers Died From A Nitrogen Leak. OSHA Has Issued $1 Million In Fines

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Children and teachers from the KU Kids Deanwood child care center in Washington, D.C., complete a mural in celebration of the launch of the child tax credit. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Community Change hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Community Change

The Expanded Child Tax Credit Is Here. Here's What You Need To Know

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The First Monthly Payments Under The Expanded Child Tax Credit Are Arriving

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What Biden's Latest Executive Order Means For Businesses And Consumers

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President Biden wants the Federal Trade Commission to curtail the use of noncompete agreements as part of a larger push to promote competition in the U.S. economy. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The number of job openings topped 9 million on the last day in May, according to the Labor Department. The number of people quitting their jobs fell slightly from April — to 3.6 million. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

In need of workers, a Domino's franchise in Washington, D.C., is offering a sign-on bonus for all positions. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

A $500 Sign-On Bonus To Deliver Pizzas? Here's What To Know About Hiring Incentives

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Millions Of Workers Say 'I Quit' As Restaurants And Hotels Reopen

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Jonathan Caballero is among the millions of workers who are rethinking how they want to live their lives after the pandemic. He has found a new job that won't require a long commute. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

As The Pandemic Recedes, Millions Of Workers Are Saying 'I Quit'

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In The Wake Of The Pandemic, Workers Are Reestablishing Their Values — By Quitting

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The Teamsters, which represents 1.4 million workers nationwide, introduced a resolution making organizing Amazon workers across the country a top priority. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Janelia's cafeteria, which was noisy and crowded in pre-pandemic times, now operates a contactless takeout system. Sarah Silbiger for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger for NPR

It's Personal: Zoom'd Out Workplace Ready For Face-To-Face Conversations To Return

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A new federal rule requires hospitals and other high-risk health care settings to implement COVID-19 safety measures, including providing personal protective equipment to workers, ensuring proper ventilation and giving workers paid time off to get vaccinated. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images