Andrea Hsu Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
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Andrea Hsu

Mike Morgan/NPR
Andrea Hsu, photographed for NPR, 11 March 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Andrea Hsu

Labor and Workplace Correspondent

Andrea Hsu is NPR's labor and workplace correspondent.

Hsu first joined NPR in 2002 and spent nearly two decades as a producer for All Things Considered. Through interviews and in-depth series, she's covered topics ranging from America's opioid epidemic to emerging research at the intersection of music and the brain. She led the award-winning NPR team that happened to be in Sichuan Province, China, when a massive earthquake struck in 2008. In the coronavirus pandemic, she reported a series of stories on the pandemic's uneven toll on women, capturing the angst that women and especially mothers were experiencing across the country, alone. Hsu came to NPR via National Geographic, the BBC, and the long-shuttered Jumping Cow Coffee House.

Story Archive

A sign outside Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland, encourages people to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Mitchell Layton/Getty Images hide caption

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Mitchell Layton/Getty Images

Companies are telling unvaccinated workers to pay more for health insurance

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President Biden promotes his administration's vaccine or testing requirements for workers at the Clayco construction site in Elk Grove Village, Ill., on Oct. 7. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

People walk by a sign for both a COVID-19 testing clinic and a Covid vaccination location outside of a Brooklyn, New York, hospital on March, 29 2021. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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United Airlines has one of the strictest vaccine mandates in the U.S., requiring all U.S. employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19 unless granted religious or medical exemptions. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A nurse from AltaMed Health Services hands out the vaccine card to people after receiving their Covid-19 vaccine in Los Angeles, California on August 17, 2021. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The supply chain is a mess. Consumers are paying the price

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A van from a COVID-19 vaccine mobile clinic hosted by McDonald's and the California Department of Public Health in September in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Biden's vaccine rules for 100 million workers are here. These are the details

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At a meeting in Concord, New Hampshire, on Oct. 13, 2021, audience members voice opposition to federal vaccine mandates. Some employers, from state governments to hospitals to private companies, have already begun enforcing their own vaccine mandates, leading to the resignation or firing of a small percentage of workers. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Holly Ramer/AP

Thousands of workers are opting to get fired, rather than take the vaccine

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ESPN reporter Allison Williams reports from a college basketball tournament at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 8, 2017. Williams said in a recent Instagram video that she is leaving ESPN due to the company's vaccine mandate. Lance King/Getty Images hide caption

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Lance King/Getty Images

Workers from a Kellogg cereal plant picket along the main rail lines leading into the facility on Oct. 6 in Omaha, Neb. Workers have gone on strike after a breakdown in contract talks with company management. Grant Schulte/AP hide caption

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Grant Schulte/AP

A two-tier wage system roiled the auto industry. Workers today say no way

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'Striketober' is here, with workers increasingly vocal about what they want

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Margaret Applegate (in yellow scarf), a United Airlines customer service agent, is accompanied by Lori Augustine, vice president of United's San Francisco hub, as Applegate gets a COVID-19 vaccine in September ahead of United's mandated deadline. Sam Almira/United Airlines hide caption

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Sam Almira/United Airlines

Faced with losing their jobs, even the most hesitant are getting vaccinated

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