Diaa Hadid Diaa Hadid chiefly covers Pakistan and Afghanistan for NPR News. She is based in NPR's bureau in Islamabad.
Diaa Hadid
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Diaa Hadid

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Diaa Hadid 2017
Alexandria Lee/NPR

Diaa Hadid

International Correspondent, Islamabad, Pakistan

Diaa Hadid chiefly covers Pakistan and Afghanistan for NPR News. She is based in NPR's bureau in Islamabad. Hadid joined NPR after reporting from the Middle East for over a decade. She worked as a correspondent for The New York Times from March 2015 to March 2017, and she was a correspondent for The Associated Press from 2006 to 2015.

Hadid documented the collapse of Gadhafi's rule in Libya from the capital, Tripoli. In Cairo's Tahrir Square, she wrote of revolutionary upheaval sweeping Egypt. She covered the violence of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria from Baghdad, Erbil, and Dohuk. From Beirut, she was the first to report on widespread malnutrition and starvation inside a besieged rebel district near Damascus. She also covered Syria's war from Damascus, Homs, Tartous, and Latakia.

Her favorite stories are about people and moments that capture the complexity of the places she covers.

They include her story on a lonely-hearts club in Gaza, run by the militant Islamic group Hamas. She unraveled the mysterious murder of a militant commander, discovering that he was killed for being gay. In the West Bank, she profiled Israel's youngest prisoner, a 12-year-old Palestinian girl who got her first period while being interrogated.

In Syria, she met the last great storyteller of Damascus, whose own trajectory of loss reflected that of his country. In Libya, she profiled a synagogue that once was the beating heart of Tripoli's Jewish community.

In Baghdad, Ms. Hadid met women who risked their lives to visit beauty salons in a quiet rebellion against extremism and war. In Lebanon, she chronicled how poverty was pushing Syrian refugee women into survival sex.

Hadid documented the Muslim pilgrimage to holy sites in Saudi Arabia, known as the Hajj, using video, photographs, and essays.

Hadid began her career as a reporter for The Gulf News in Dubai in 2004, covering the abuse and hardships of foreign workers in the United Arab Emirates. She was raised in Canberra by a Lebanese father and an Egyptian mother. She graduated from the Australian National University with a B.A. (with Honors) specializing in Arabic, a language she speaks fluently. She also makes do in Hebrew and Spanish.

Her passions are photography, cooking, vintage dress shopping, and listening to the radio. She sings really badly, but that won't stop her.

Meet Hadid on Twitter @diaahadid, or see her photos on Instagram. She also often posts up her work on her community Facebook page.

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Story Archive

Students sit in class at Jamia Muhammadia, a madrassa in the Pakistani capital Islamabad. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Pakistan Wants To Reform Madrassas. Experts Advise Fixing Public Education First

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Pakistan's Prime Minister Tries To Reform Politically Powerful Madrassas

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Nostalgia For Vespas Is Fueling A Revival Of The Iconic Scooter In Pakistan

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In Pakistan, Women Riding Bikes Fight Taboo: 'We Feel Free'

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Supporters of former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif shout slogans against the government outside an accountability court in Islamabad, where Sharif was sentenced Monday to seven years in prison. B.K. Bangash/AP hide caption

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Suhai Aziz Talpur, seen in her office in Karachi's Clifton police station, has emerged as a hero in Pakistan after she led a mission to take down militants who stormed the Chinese consulate in November. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Sikh worshippers gather outside their holiest site, the Gurdwara Darbar Sahib Kartarpur. It is believed to be the place where the founder of Sikhism, Guru Nanak, died in the 16th century. In a rare goodwill gesture this week, India and Pakistan broke ground on a corridor that will allow visa-free travel for Indian Sikhs to the holy site. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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In Gesture To India, Pakistan To Open Cross-Border Pathway To Sikh Holy Site

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Pakistan And India Begin Construction On Corridor Linking The Two Countries

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Mehnaz sits inside her home in Abbottabad, northern Pakistan. She has one son and six daughters. She has also had three abortions, fearing she would have more girls. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Why The Abortion Rate In Pakistan Is One Of The World's Highest

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A Pakistani ranger stands in front of a damaged gate at the Chinese consulate after an attack in Karachi on Friday. Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Militants, Police Killed In Failed Attack On Chinese Consulate In Karachi

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Mir, a Pakistani man who used to live in Xinjiang, China, clutches the hands of his two daughters. Since Chinese authorities detained his wife, he's been raising their two girls alone. "My mind just won't work," he says. "I sound incoherent, I can't think, I even forget what to say in my prayers." Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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'My Family Has Been Broken': Pakistanis Fear For Uighur Wives Held In China

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A Pakistani supporter of the Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ), a hardline religious party, holds an image of Christian woman Asia Bibi during a protest rally following the Supreme Court's decision to acquit Bibi of blasphemy in Islamabad. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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