Diaa Hadid Diaa Hadid chiefly covers Pakistan and Afghanistan for NPR News. She is based in NPR's bureau in Islamabad.
Diaa Hadid
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Diaa Hadid

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Diaa Hadid 2017
Alexandria Lee/NPR

Diaa Hadid

International Correspondent, Islamabad, Pakistan

Diaa Hadid chiefly covers Pakistan and Afghanistan for NPR News. She is based in NPR's bureau in Islamabad. There, Hadid and her team were awarded a Murrow in 2019 for hard news for their story on why abortion rates in Pakistan are among the highest in the world.

Hadid has also documented the culture war surrounding Valentines' Day in Pakistan, the country's love affair with Vespa scooters and the struggle of a band of women and girls to ride their bikes in public. She visited a town notorious in Pakistan for a series of child rapes and murders, and attended class with young Pakistanis racing to learn Mandarin as China's influence over the country expands.

Hadid joined NPR after reporting from the Middle East for over a decade. She worked as a correspondent for The New York Times from March 2015 to March 2017, and she was a correspondent for The Associated Press from 2006 to 2015.

Hadid documented the collapse of Gadhafi's rule in Libya from the capital, Tripoli. In Cairo's Tahrir Square, she wrote of revolutionary upheaval sweeping Egypt. She covered the violence of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria from Baghdad, Erbil and Dohuk. From Beirut, she was the first to report on widespread malnutrition and starvation inside a besieged rebel district near Damascus. She also covered Syria's war from Damascus, Homs, Tartous and Latakia.

Her favorite stories are about people and moments that capture the complexity of the places she covers.

They include her story on a lonely-hearts club in Gaza, run by the militant Islamic group Hamas. She unraveled the mysterious murder of a militant commander, discovering that he was killed for being gay. In the West Bank, she profiled Israel's youngest prisoner, a 12-year-old Palestinian girl who got her first period while being interrogated.

In Syria, she met the last great storyteller of Damascus, whose own trajectory of loss reflected that of his country. In Libya, she profiled a synagogue that once was the beating heart of Tripoli's Jewish community.

In Baghdad, Hadid met women who risked their lives to visit beauty salons in a quiet rebellion against extremism and war. In Lebanon, she chronicled how poverty was pushing Syrian refugee women into survival sex.

Hadid documented the Muslim pilgrimage to holy sites in Saudi Arabia, known as the Hajj, using video, photographs and essays.

Hadid began her career as a reporter for The Gulf News in Dubai in 2004, covering the abuse and hardships of foreign workers in the United Arab Emirates. She was raised in Canberra by a Lebanese father and an Egyptian mother. She graduated from the Australian National University with a B.A. (with Honors) specializing in Arabic, a language she speaks fluently. She also makes do in Hebrew and Spanish.

Her passions are her daughter, photography, cooking, vintage dress shopping and listening to the radio. She sings really badly, but that won't stop her.

Meet Hadid on Twitter @diaahadid, or see her photos on Instagram. She also often posts up her work on her community Facebook page.

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An honor guard is formed at Defence Headquarters in Canberra, Australia, before findings from the Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force Afghanistan Inquiry are released on Thursday. A report found evidence that 25 soldiers unlawfully killed 39 Afghan prisoners, farmers and civilians. Mick Tsikas/AP hide caption

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After Australian Report, Calls Grow For More Investigations Of Abuses In Afghanistan

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Australia's Military Reports Alleged War Crimes By Australians In Afghanistan

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An Afghan National Army soldier stands guard at a checkpoint near the Bagram airfield, the largest U.S. military base in Afghanistan, in April. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

What Joe Biden's Presidency May Mean For Afghanistan

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Trump To Order Thousands Of U.S. Troops Withdrawn From Afghanistan

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Will Afghanistan Force Female Soccer Players From The Field For Peace With Taliban?

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Much recent international media attention has been focused on the U.S. presidential elections, like this live news report showing on an outdoor screen in Hong Kong. Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

All Eyes On US

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Gunmen Kill At Least 19 People In An Attack On Afghan University

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A man, wounded after gunmen stormed Kabul University, arrives in an ambulance at Isteqlal Hospital on Monday. At least 19 people died in the attack on Afghanistan's largest university. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

At Least 19 People Are Killed In Attack On Kabul University

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Afghans flee to Lashkar Gah, Helmand's provincial capital, during fighting between Taliban and Afghan security forces on Monday. Local authorities estimate that some 35,000 people have been displaced into Lashkar Gah since a Taliban offensive began in Helmand. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tens Of Thousands Flee Latest Taliban Offensive, And Afghan Civilian Casualties Rise

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Afghan Peace Talks Stalled Over Rules To Refer To When Sides Reach A Deadlock

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Afghans Worry Withdrawal Of Foreign Forces May Compromise Peace Talks With Taliban

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Laiba Atik, 17-year-old, city administrator Mardan at National Association for Sustainable Development of Pakistan and an activist for climate change along with her sister Maira Atiq check on the trees they had planted earlier in the season in the nearby park where they live on August 31, 2020 in Mardan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Saiyna Bashir for NPR hide caption

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With Glaciers Melting And Temps Soaring, Pakistan Pursues Big Action On Climate Change

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Shamsia Alizada, left school in 2018 after an ISIS suicide bomber struck the academy in Kabul where she was studying. Now she's scored the highest grades on Afghanistan's nation-wide university entrance exams at a time when negotiations with the Taliban threaten the rights of women in the country. Twitter/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Twitter/ Screenshot by NPR