Gisele Grayson Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor for NPR's science desk. She runs the NPR side of a collaboration with Kaiser Health News (KHN), a nonprofit news service focused on health care policy and politics.
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Gisele Grayson

Gisele Grayson

Deputy Editor, Science Desk

Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits general science, environmental coverage and health policy.

From 2011 to 2018, she ran the NPR side of a collaboration with Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service focused on health care policy and politics. The collaboration includes more than 30 reporters from public radio stations across the country who cover everything from health care trends to major health care legislation. This team has provided extensive coverage of both the Affordable Care Act and all the efforts to change the health law.

Grayson started her NPR career in June, 2001. She contributed to NPR's coverage of the September 11 attacks and the anthrax attacks later that fall. Then, she went into the field with many different reporters to produce stories that ranged from the tsunami in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, to black lung in West Virginia, to dinosaurs and the Y chromosome. Grayson also spent a month in Mississippi working on stories about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In 2008, she traveled around the country with Linda Wertheimer talking to voters. She has worked on All Things Considered, produced live election night coverage in 2010 and won a national health care reporting award for producing a story on osteopenia with reporter Alix Spiegel.

Before working at NPR, Grayson worked for various law firms in Washington, DC and New York and spent six years at The Conference Board in New York. Grayson graduated from Wesleyan University and has a Master of International Affairs degree from Columbia University.

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As mother and daughter, Carmen and Gisele Grayson thought their DNA ancestry tests would be very similar. Boy were they surprised. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

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Diane Brown, executive director of the Arizona Public Interest Research Group, talks to college students about the benefits of buying health coverage on the exchanges. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

With ACA Plans A Tougher Sell, Insurers Bring On The Puppies

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Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

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Ben Allen/WITF

Sen. Lindsey Graham (from left), Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Ron Johnson and Sen. John McCain, all Republicans, announced Thursday that they would not vote for a so-called skinny repeal of the Affordable Care Act without assurances from the House that the bill would go to conference. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence, right, and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus arrive on Capitol Hill on Tuesday for the Senate procedural vote on health care overhaul. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The Call-In: Your Questions About The Senate Health Care Bill

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leaves the chamber after announcing the release of the Republicans' health care bill on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

CHART: Who Wins, Who Loses With Senate Health Care Bill

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The Call-In: Answering Your Questions About The Republican Health Care Plan

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The scariest part of the holiday comes in the days that follow, as parents fight and negotiate to limit how much candy their kids eat. NPR's Gisele Grayson decided to pay her kids off to give up their loot. iStockphoto hide caption

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