Gisele Grayson Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits stories about climate, the environment, space, and about basic research in biology and physics.
Gisele Grayson
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Gisele Grayson

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Gisele Grayson
Wanyu Zhang /NPR

Gisele Grayson

Deputy Editor, Science Desk

Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits stories about climate, the environment, space, and about basic research in biology and physics.

From 2011 to 2018, she ran the NPR side of a collaboration with Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service focused on health care policy and politics. The collaboration includes more than 30 reporters from public radio stations across the country and provided extensive coverage of both the Affordable Care Act and all the efforts to change the health law.

Grayson started her NPR career in June 2001. She contributed to NPR's coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks and the anthrax attacks later that fall. She traveled with reporters and worked on stories that ranged from the tsunami in Indonesia to black lung in West Virginia, and from dinosaurs to the Y chromosome. Grayson also spent a month in Mississippi working on stories about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In 2008, she traveled around the country with Linda Wertheimer talking to voters. She has worked on All Things Considered, produced election night coverage in 2010, and won a national health care reporting award for producing a story on osteopenia with reporter Alix Spiegel.

Before working at NPR, Grayson worked for various law firms in Washington, DC, and New York, and planned meetings for business executives at The Conference Board in New York. Grayson graduated from Wesleyan University and has a master's degree in international affairs from Columbia University.

Story Archive

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Rob Riingen/Julia Ruth

Short Wave Goes To The Circus

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A researcher holds a Northern long eared bat in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech hide caption

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Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

Buckle up! Short Wave is going on a road trip every Friday this summer. In this first episode of our series on the research happening in the National Park system, we head to Shenandoah National Park and the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Some bats there are faring better than others against white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has killed more than 7 million bats in the last decade. Today — what researchers like Jesse De La Cruz think is enabling some bat species to survive.

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

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In this composite image provided by NASA, the SDO satellite captures the path sequence of the transit of Venus across the face of the sun on June 5-6, 2012 as seen from space. The next pair of events will not happen again until the year 2117 and 2125. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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Venus And The 18th Century Space Race

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The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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U.S. President George Bush jokes with French marine biologist Jacques Cousteau, center, and Jo Elizabeth Butler, the legal adviser of the Climate Change Secretariat, in Rio de Janeiro after signing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, June 12, 1992. The draft was hammered out the month before in New York. Dennis Cook / AP hide caption

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Dennis Cook / AP

A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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Signs warning of health risks are posted outside the gates of abandoned uranium mine in the community of Red Water Pond on Monday, Jan. 13th, 2020. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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An octopus named Lizbeth is helping scientists study distributed intelligence in a lab in the San Juan Islands. Stephani Gordon/OPB hide caption

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What Octopus Minds May Tell Us About Aliens

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Indoor Air Quality is Cool for Schools

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