Gisele Grayson Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits stories about climate, the environment, space, and about basic research in biology and physics.
Gisele Grayson
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Gisele Grayson

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Gisele Grayson
Wanyu Zhang /NPR

Gisele Grayson

Deputy Editor, Science Desk

Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits stories about climate, the environment, space, and about basic research in biology and physics.

From 2011 to 2018, she ran the NPR side of a collaboration with Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service focused on health care policy and politics. The collaboration includes more than 30 reporters from public radio stations across the country and provided extensive coverage of both the Affordable Care Act and all the efforts to change the health law.

Grayson started her NPR career in June 2001. She contributed to NPR's coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks and the anthrax attacks later that fall. She traveled with reporters and worked on stories that ranged from the tsunami in Indonesia to black lung in West Virginia, and from dinosaurs to the Y chromosome. Grayson also spent a month in Mississippi working on stories about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In 2008, she traveled around the country with Linda Wertheimer talking to voters. She has worked on All Things Considered, produced election night coverage in 2010, and won a national health care reporting award for producing a story on osteopenia with reporter Alix Spiegel.

Before working at NPR, Grayson worked for various law firms in Washington, DC, and New York, and planned meetings for business executives at The Conference Board in New York. Grayson graduated from Wesleyan University and has a master's degree in international affairs from Columbia University.

Story Archive

The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Guitard/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek
Alex Brandon/AP

U.S. President George Bush jokes with French marine biologist Jacques Cousteau, center, and Jo Elizabeth Butler, the legal adviser of the Climate Change Secretariat, in Rio de Janeiro after signing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change, June 12, 1992. The draft was hammered out the month before in New York. Dennis Cook / AP hide caption

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Dennis Cook / AP

A Climate Time Capsule, Part 2: The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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Christoph Burgstedt/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

A Climate Time Capsule (Part 1): The Start of the International Climate Change Fight

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Signs warning of health risks are posted outside the gates of abandoned uranium mine in the community of Red Water Pond on Monday, Jan. 13th, 2020. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

An octopus named Lizbeth is helping scientists study distributed intelligence in a lab in the San Juan Islands. Stephani Gordon/OPB hide caption

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Stephani Gordon/OPB

What Octopus Minds May Tell Us About Aliens

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Classroom in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States Mint Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Indoor Air Quality is Cool for Schools

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The podcast Science Vs. has called on its parent company, Spotify, to curb misinformation on its platform. Thanee Chooha Noom/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanee Chooha Noom/EyeEm/Getty Images

Fighting Misinformation With Science Journalism

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Artist's impression of Dragonfly on Titan's surface. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

What Mount Kilimanjaro Has To Do With The Search For Alien Life

Understanding how life survives in extreme Earth environments could point to ways life can survive on other worlds. Astrobiologist Morgan Cable talks to host Emily Kwong about how her missions here on Earth have guided two upcoming NASA missions in search for alien life, not in a far off galaxy, but here in our solar system. The Titan Dragonfly and the Europa Clipper missions will each explore an ocean world in our solar system, where scientists believe we could find life--life that may be unlike anything we've seen before. Today on Short Wave, life as we know it - and life as we don't know it.

What Mount Kilimanjaro Has To Do With The Search For Alien Life

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Season 2 of In Those Genes produced and hosted by geneticist Janina Jeff is out now. David Perrin/Idalmiz López/Janina Jeff hide caption

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David Perrin/Idalmiz López/Janina Jeff

Genetic Fact Vs. Fiction And Everything In Between With Janina Jeff

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Muddied hands are pictured next to newly planted tree seedlings as Ethiopians take part in a national tree-planting drive in the capital Addis Ababa, on July 28, 2019. Michael Tewelde/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Tewelde/AFP via Getty Images

Silver Linings From The UN's Dire Climate Change Report

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Abra Lee is a horticulturalist and studies U.S. gardening history. She fondly remembers her own relatives' gardens as holding a special place in horticultural history. Carlos Alejandro/Abra Lee hide caption

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Carlos Alejandro/Abra Lee

Tracing A Fraught And Amazing History Of American Horticulture

When Abra Lee became the landscape manager at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, she sought some advice about how to best do the job. The answer: study the history of gardening. That led to her uncovering how Black involvement in horticulture in the U.S. bursts with incredible stories and profound expertise, intertwined with a tragic past. She's now teaching these stories and working on a book, Conquer the Soil: Black America and the Untold Stories of Our Country's Gardeners, Farmers, and Growers. Abra Lee talks with Short Wave producer Eva Tesfaye about uncovering Black horticultural history and several hidden figures who shaped it.

Tracing A Fraught And Amazing History Of American Horticulture

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