Gisele Grayson Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits stories about climate, the environment, space, and about basic research in biology and physics.
Gisele Grayson
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Gisele Grayson

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Gisele Grayson
Wanyu Zhang /NPR

Gisele Grayson

Deputy Editor, Science Desk

Gisele Grayson is a deputy editor on NPR's science desk. She edits stories about climate, the environment, space, and about basic research in biology and physics.

From 2011 to 2018, she ran the NPR side of a collaboration with Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service focused on health care policy and politics. The collaboration includes more than 30 reporters from public radio stations across the country and provided extensive coverage of both the Affordable Care Act and all the efforts to change the health law.

Grayson started her NPR career in June 2001. She contributed to NPR's coverage of the Sept. 11 attacks and the anthrax attacks later that fall. She traveled with reporters and worked on stories that ranged from the tsunami in Indonesia to black lung in West Virginia, and from dinosaurs to the Y chromosome. Grayson also spent a month in Mississippi working on stories about the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In 2008, she traveled around the country with Linda Wertheimer talking to voters. She has worked on All Things Considered, produced election night coverage in 2010, and won a national health care reporting award for producing a story on osteopenia with reporter Alix Spiegel.

Before working at NPR, Grayson worked for various law firms in Washington, DC, and New York, and planned meetings for business executives at The Conference Board in New York. Grayson graduated from Wesleyan University and has a master's degree in international affairs from Columbia University.

Story Archive

Wednesday

The directors of Everything Everywhere All At Once credit their "math brain" for this genre bending story, about laundromat owner Evelyn Wang (Michelle Yeoh) battling for the fate of the multiverse. A24 hide caption

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A24

Tuesday

The Colorado River is imperiled, parched by droughts exacerbated by climate change. According to a 2017 study, waterflow could drop 30% by 2050 and 55% by 2100 due to greenhouse gas emissions. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The /Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The /Denver Post via Getty Images

A course correction in managing drying rivers

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Wednesday

Meltwater from the surface of Helheim Glacier in Greenland percolates down to the bed and lubricates the ice's movement. Jessica Mejia/Jessica Mejia hide caption

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Jessica Mejia/Jessica Mejia

Tuesday

Stanford University/Getty Images

Zircon: The Keeper Of Earth's Time

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Monday

In urban areas, redlining has continuing effects on wildlife as well as people. Ali Majdfar/Getty Images hide caption

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Ali Majdfar/Getty Images

Redlining's Ripple Effects Go Beyond Humans

When Dr. Chloé Schmidt was a PhD student in Winnepeg, Canada, she was studying wildlife in urban areas. She and her advisor Dr. Colin Garroway came across a 2020 paper that posed a hypothesis: If the echos of systemic racism affect the human residents of neighborhoods and cities, then it should affect the wildlife as well. Short Wave Scientist in Residence Regina G. Barber talks to Chloé and Colin about their findings of how redlining and biodiversity are intertwined.

Redlining's Ripple Effects Go Beyond Humans

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Thursday

The menstrual cycle is a multi-stage process lasting an average of 28 days. The menses phase of the cycle, when the uterine lining is shed and vaginal bleeding occurs, typically lasts about 3 to 5 days. Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Getty Images/Westend61

Monday

Happy holidays from Short Wave! And may you stay virus (snowflake) free! Gisele Grayson hide caption

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Gisele Grayson

A Holiday Fact Exchange!

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Thursday

Canadian Minister of the Environment and climate change Steven Guilbeault and other delegates listens to COP President Chinese Minister of Ecology and Environment Huang Runqiu (unseen) at a plenary meeting during the United Nations Biodiversity Conference (COP15) in Montreal, Quebec, on December 19, 2022. LARS HAGBERG/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LARS HAGBERG/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday

Friday

Illustration of DART, from behind the NEXT–C ion engine NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

Thursday

Eosinophilia, blood smear with numerous eosinophils, computer illustration. Eosinophils, like all white blood cells, are part of the immune system. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Wednesday

Lava flows from the Mauna Loa volcano on December 4, 2022 near Hilo, Hawaii. Mauna Loa is the largest active volcano in the world. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Thursday

The silhouette of a person is seen in the middle of a large gallery space at ARTECHOUSE in Washington, DC. Panels covering the surrounding walls and floor are illuminated with artistic projections of neurons. ARTECHOUSE Team hide caption

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ARTECHOUSE Team

Arts Week: The Life Cycle Of A Neuron

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Friday

Geneticist Adam Rutherford's newest book is about the rise of the political movement of eugenics alongside advancements in genetics. W. W. Norton & Company hide caption

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W. W. Norton & Company

Wednesday

The last male contraceptive to hit the market was the condom — about 200 years ago. Now, there are several hormonal and non-hormonal male contraceptives in early trial stages. Researchers are pursuing everything from oral pills to injections and gels. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images