Wynne Davis
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Wynne Davis

Puerto Rican astrologer Walter Mercado died Saturday at age 87. His work as a flamboyant astrologer and television personality whose daily TV appearances entertained many across Latin America for decades. Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo/AP hide caption

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Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo/AP

Simone Biles has two more signature moves named for her after she nailed them during performances at the world championships. Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images hide caption

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Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

Four people were killed and five others injured in a shooting at a bar in Kansas City, Kan., early Sunday morning. The shooters were armed with handguns when they fled the scene, according to police. Ed Zurga/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Zurga/Getty Images

Pro-democracy protests continued for the 18th week in Hong Kong on Sunday. Demonstrators continued to wear face masks and goggles despite a ban put into place by the city's chief executive Carrie Lam on Friday. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

A fire that broke out on Friday night in the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, has left nearly 10,000 people homeless. The fire destroyed hundreds of shanties in a slum where many people are low-wage garment-factory workers. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

A naturalization ceremony of new U.S. citizens at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas, Virginia. The U.S. citizenship oath today is 140 words. It wasn't until 1929 that the oath's text was standardized, and the oath was amended in 1952 to emphasize service to country as the U.S. faced a growing threat from the Soviet Union. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Shuran Huang/NPR

How The U.S. Citizenship Oath Came To Be What It Is Today

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A day after his synagogue was attacked, Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein held a press conference outside the Chabad of Poway Synagogue to recount what happened during the deadly attack. Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

When the Mueller report was released, Ronnie Hipshire was surprised to find a photo of his father Lee on a poster to support President Trump that was created by Russians. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

Inside The Mueller Report, This Man Saw A Photo Of His Dad Being Used By Russians

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