Louisa Lim Based in Beijing, NPR international correspondent Louisa Lim finds China a hugely diverse, vibrant, fascinating place. Lim opened NPR's Shanghai bureau in February 2006.

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Inventor Who Made Chinese Easier To Read, Dies

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Daryl James was just 15-years-old when he arrived at the Army Apprentice School in the 1970s. He says he was repeatedly abused, as were many others. Now he returns every year just to confirm that the school is still gone. "The ghosts have gone now, " he told NPR. Louisa Lim for NPR hide caption

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Louisa Lim for NPR

In Australia, Decades Of Abuse Against Military Recruits Comes To Light

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Civilians hold rocks as they stand on a government armored vehicle near Chang'an Boulevard in Beijing, early June 4, 1989, before the army began a crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in and around Tiananmen Square. Jeff Widener/AP hide caption

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Jeff Widener/AP

June 4: The Day That Defines, And Still Haunts China

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Artist and former soldier Chen Guang stands with one of his paintings last year that depicts the scene when he helped clear Tiananmen Square as a soldier. Louisa Lim/NPR hide caption

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For One Soldier At Tiananmen, A Day 'Never Forgotten'

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A Chinese man who became known as "Tank Man" stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing's Changan Avenue just outside Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. It's an iconic image known around the world --€” except in China. Jeff Widener/AP hide caption

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Jeff Widener/AP

For Many Of China's Youth, June 4 May As Well Be Just Another Day

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25 Years On, Mothers Of Tiananmen Square Dead Seek Answers

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After People's Armed Police were deployed to clear the square on June 4, pitched battles broke out between police and angry crowds throwing stones. Courtesy photo hide caption

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Courtesy photo

After 25 Years Of Amnesia, Remembering A Forgotten Tiananmen

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Dingding Mao is a professional mourner, who is paid for her talents at singing the funeral dirge. This is a tradition that began in the Han dynasty 2,000 years ago. Courtesy of Wu Peng hide caption

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Courtesy of Wu Peng

Belly Dancing For The Dead: A Day With China's Top Mourner

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For 24 years, Ding Zilin has sought justice for the death of her 17-year-old son, Jiang Jielian, on June 3, the night before Chinese authorities cracked down on protesters in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Now, the 76-year-old despairs that she will die before she is allowed to mourn her son on the spot where he was killed. She stands in front of a small shrine to her son in her Beijing home. Louisa Lim/NPR hide caption

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A small, child-like creature in a cone hat peers into a toy shop, happy at the sight of a snow globe, in a vignette called "Tininess" in Darkness Outside the Night, a graphic novel illustrated by Xie Peng. Find out what happens in the excerpt below. Xie Peng and Duncan Jepson, with permission to reproduce the panels from Tabella Publishing LLP hide caption

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Xie Peng and Duncan Jepson, with permission to reproduce the panels from Tabella Publishing LLP

For China's Youth, A Life Of 'Darkness Outside The Night'

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Chinese police lead a group of defendants, including millionaire and politician Li Qiang, to court on organized crime charges in 2009. Many of those arrested in now-imprisoned politician Bo Xilai's campaign against the mafia still remain in jail, despite serious legal questions about the process. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Targets Of Disgraced Bo Xilai Still Languish In Jail

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The video for Chinese artist Ai Weiwei's newly released song starts by re-creating the conditions of his captivity during the 81 days he was held in police detention in 2011, and later dissolves into a dystopian nightmare. Courtesy Ai Weiwei hide caption

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Courtesy Ai Weiwei

China's Artist Provocateur Explores New Medium: Heavy Metal

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The children of wealthy Chinese attend classes designed to teach them how to do things like raise money for charity. The parents pay up to $10,000 a year to send their kids to weekend classes. Angie Quan/NPR hide caption

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Children Of China's Wealthy Learn Expensive Lessons

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Zhang Ming lost her 5-year-old daughter, her parents and her home in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. She now operates a stall selling food and drinks, and she and her husband have another daughter. But life is difficult. "We are facing the problem of how to survive, so we don't have time to think of anything else. If you have too much free time, you think about things too much." Louisa Lim/NPR hide caption

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The wife of Li Yiqian, Yang Liming, sits in their house, which is plastered with pictures of China's leaders, an attempt to help prevent local authorities from demolishing it. Her husband has been sentenced to three years in prison for organizing a crowd to create a disturbance; she believes it's for his work in helping dispossessed villagers petition. Louisa Lim/NPR hide caption

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Five Years After A Quake, Chinese Cite Shoddy Reconstruction

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