Anjuli Sastry Anjuli Sastry is a producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders and a 2021 Nieman Journalism Foundation Visiting Fellow.
Anjuli Sastry
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Anjuli Sastry

Photo by Suresh Sastry
Anjuli Sastry
Photo by Suresh Sastry

Anjuli Sastry

Producer, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Anjuli Sastry (she/her) is a producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders and a 2021 Nieman Journalism Foundation Visiting Fellow. During her Nieman fellowship in spring 2021, Sastry created, hosted and produced the audio and video series Where We Come From. The series tells the stories of immigrant communities of color through a personal and historical lens.

Since 2017, Sastry has been a producer on the NPR podcast and weekend radio show It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. In that role, Sastry cuts interviews, writes scripts, books guests, scores episodes, plans future coverage, leads editorial direction of episodes and more. She's produced episodes that look at gun violence in Oakland, a deep dive into the history of drag culture and interviews with folks like John Legend and Jennifer Lopez. She also produces live shows in places like Iowa and Chicago and directs weekly tapings of It's Been a Minute.

Sastry started her career at NPR on the flagship newsmagazine All Things Considered. In this role, Sastry led the show's social media team, was the lead producer for the 25th anniversary of the Los Angeles Riots series and reported in the Southwest and Mexico with Melissa Block and Elissa Nadworny for the special series Our Land.

She's worked as a producer for Marketplace and Press Play at KCRW, and her work has appeared in NPR's Life Kit, Morning Edition, Weekend All Things Considered and ABC News.

Sastry is a co-founder of the Marginalized Genders and Intersex People of Color Mentorship Program at NPR. She and her co-founders received the NPR Diversity Success employee award for their work in 2018. She was also part of the inaugural 2018 Online News Association Journalism Mentorship Collaborative and has spoken about mentorship at Werk It: A Women's Podcast Festival and the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

In 2019, Sastry was named an AIR New Voices Scholar.

Hailing from the San Francisco Bay Area, Sastry earned her bachelor's degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and graduated with honors from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Story Archive

A "Help Wanted" sign posted in Brooklyn New York. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe brings on CBS MoneyWatch editor Irina Ivanova to break down some of the reasons why. Then, The New Republic staff writer Jo Livingstone joins Ayesha to discuss the current state of horror movies and why nothing's better than a good scare. Author and Big Mood, Little Mood podcast host Daniel Lavery joins them to play Who Said That.

Why Workers Are Quitting; Plus The Comfort Of Horror Movies

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Sha'Carri Richardson competes in the Women's 100 Meter on day 2 of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team Trials at Hayward Field on June 19, 2021 in Eugene, Oregon. Andy Lyons/Getty Images hide caption

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The Weight On Black Women In Sports; Plus, 'We Are Lady Parts'

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A Mother And Daughter Wrote A Cookbook To Show How Food Traditions Change

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Where We Come From: What's In A Nigerian Name

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Podcast host and author Luvvie Ajayi Jones. Elton Anderson Jr. hide caption

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Elton Anderson Jr.

Priya and Ritu Krishna in their Dallas kitchen. NPR hide caption

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'Where We Come From': Priya And Ritu Krishna On Indian Cooking And Assimilation

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Emily Kwong, age 2, and her grandparents, Hui and Edgar Kwong. Emily Kwong hide caption

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Emily Kwong

Immigration activist and temporary protected status holder César Magaña Linares poses for a portrait. Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

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Emily Kwong is host and reporter of NPR's Short Wave podcast. Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

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VIDEO: A Daughter's Journey To Reclaim Her Heritage Language

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Sam Sanders and Malcolm Gladwell live in conversation on Sept. 11, 2019 in Washington, D.C. Alexander McCall/NPR hide caption

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Malcolm Gladwell And 'Talking To Strangers'

Sam revisits his chat with best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell about his book, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know. The book explores examples such as the arrest of Sandra Bland and the Stanford rape case as to why interactions with strangers often go so wrong. This episode was taped in front of a live studio audience at The George Washington University's Lisner Auditorium in September 2019.

Malcolm Gladwell And 'Talking To Strangers'

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