Anjuli Sastry Associate Producer, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Anjuli Sastry is an Associate Producer for It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
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Anjuli Sastry

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Anjuli Sastry is an Associate Producer for It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Kara Frame/NPR

Anjuli Sastry

Associate Producer, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Anjuli Sastry is a producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. In her role, Sastry cuts interviews, writes scripts, books guests, scores music, plans future coverage, decides the editorial direction of episodes and more. Her work has ranged from producing episodes that look at gun violence in Oakland, a deep dive into the history of drag culture and interviews with folks like John Legend and Jennifer Lopez. Her work also involves producing live shows in places like Iowa and Chicago and directing weekly tapings of It's Been a Minute.

Sastry started her career at NPR on the flagship newsmagazine All Things Considered. In this role, Sastry led the show's social media team, was the lead producer for the 25th anniversary of the Los Angeles Riots series and reported in the Southwest and Mexico with Melissa Block and Elissa Nadworny for the special series Our Land.

She's worked as a producer for Marketplace and Press Play at KCRW, and her work has appeared in NPR's Life Kit, Morning Edition, Weekend All Things Considered and ABC News.

Sastry is a founder and leader of the NPR Women of Color Mentorship Program. She and her co-founders received the NPR Diversity Success employee award for their work in 2018. She was also part of the inaugural 2018 Online News Association Journalism Mentorship Collaborative and has spoken about mentorship at Werk It: A Women's Podcast Festival and the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

In 2019, Sastry was named an AIR New Voices Scholar.

Hailing from the San Francisco Bay Area, Sastry earned her bachelor's degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley and graduated with honors from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

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Michaela Coel writes, directs and stars in I May Destroy You on HBO. Laura Radford/HBO hide caption

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Summer Pop Culture Recs, Plus A Visit With Kirk Franklin

It's summer without a lot of the usual summer fun because, you know, pandemic. But we've got music and TV recommendations to keep you company. Joining Sam are All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish and Code Switch co-host Gene Demby to chat about their TV picks — Netflix's Bojack Horseman and HBO's I May Destroy You — and to play a special summer songs version of Who Said That. Then, Sam chats with gospel musician, songwriter and author Kirk Franklin about how his music and faith are a balm for these turbulent times.

Summer Pop Culture Recs, Plus A Visit With Kirk Franklin

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How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

How much has Big Tech changed since the 2016 election? Sam is joined by Washington Post tech reporters Elizabeth Dwoskin and Tony Romm. They chat about Facebook and Twitter and how their platforms and views on free speech have evolved since the last presidential election. Sam also chats with Washington Post columnist and satirist Alexandra Petri about her book of essays Nothing Is Wrong and Here Is Why and how she uses humor to uncover bigger truths.

How Much Have Facebook And Twitter Changed Since 2016?

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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients celebrate in front of the Supreme Court after the Supreme Court rejected President Donald Trump's effort to end legal protections for young immigrants, Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court Protects Rights For DACA And LGBTQ Workers

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LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 12: Black Lives Matter supporters are seen on the roof of a van during a rally in Trafalgar Square on June 12, 2020 in London, United Kingdom. (Photo by Peter Summers/Getty Images) Peter Summers/Getty Images hide caption

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Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

The killing of George Floyd has inspired global protests against police brutality, and it seems like everyone has something to say, including the entertainment industry. Sam's joined by NPR television critic Eric Deggans and Tonya Mosley, co-host of NPR/WBUR's Here & Now and host of the KQED podcast Truth Be Told. They talk about the cancellation of the long-running reality TV show Cops, the removal of Gone With the Wind from HBO Max, and what it all says about this moment. After that, Sam chats with Rev. Jacqui Lewis, senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan, and Rev. angel Kyodo williams, a Zen priest. They talk about what Black people and white people should be doing differently now and give Sam a bit of sermon.

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

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Demonstrators raise their fists in downtown Los Angeles on June 3, during a protest over the death of George Floyd. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Not Just Another Protest

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Money and Coronavirus; Samantha Irby On Judge Mathis

The coronavirus pandemic has us worrying not only about our health, but also about money. Sam talks to CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger, about the current economic crisis and how it's affecting different generations. Then, Sam talks to writer Samantha Irby about her newsletter "Who's On Judge Mathis Today?," which recaps the foibles of the syndicated daytime court show Judge Mathis.

Money and Coronavirus; Samantha Irby On Judge Mathis

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Residents of the Living Memory Care and assisted living home of Vadnais Heights have a heroes work here sign put up for the health care workers that take care of them every day. (Photo by: Michael Siluk) Michael Siluk/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 7: Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., gives his closing remarks at a Senate Health Education Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on new coronavirus tests May 7th, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington DC. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images) Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Weekly Wrap: Back To Capitol Hill

Politics may not be the first thing on minds right now, but it's still happening. With the Senate returning to session this week, Sam checks in to see how Capitol Hill is operating safely. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis discusses how congressional members are taking precautions, while NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe explains how President Trump's election rallies could possibly continue with social distancing in place. Then, Sam calls up an artist in Sweden — which hasn't imposed strict lockdown measures— to find out what everyday life now looks like.

Weekly Wrap: Back To Capitol Hill

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Love And Coronavirus

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Love On Lockdown: Tips For Dating During The Coronavirus Crisis

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Movie theaters remain closed as stay-at-home orders continue in many parts of the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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TV, Movies And Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is affecting all parts of the entertainment industry. Sam talks to writer and comedian Jenny Yang and camera operator Jessica Hershatter, whose jobs are on hold due to shutdowns. Also, Sam and LA Times entertainment reporter Meredith Blake discuss television and streaming. And joining Sam for a special edition of Who Said That is Shea Serrano, staff writer for The Ringer and author of the book Movies (and Other Things).

TV, Movies And Coronavirus

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These images depict high traffic locations that are currently deserted because of Stay-at-Home order in Los Angeles. Robert LeBlanc/Getty Images hide caption

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