Anjuli Sastry Krbechek Anjuli Sastry is a producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders and a 2021 Nieman Journalism Foundation Visiting Fellow.
Anjuli Sastry
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Anjuli Sastry Krbechek

Photo by Suresh Sastry
Anjuli Sastry
Photo by Suresh Sastry

Anjuli Sastry Krbechek

Producer, It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Anjuli Sastry (she/her) is a producer on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders and a 2021 Nieman Journalism Foundation Visiting Fellow. During her Nieman fellowship in spring 2021, Sastry created, hosted and produced the audio and video series Where We Come From. The series tells the stories of immigrant communities of color through a personal and historical lens.

Since 2017, Sastry has been a producer on the NPR podcast and weekend radio show It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. In that role, Sastry cuts interviews, writes scripts, books guests, scores episodes, plans future coverage, leads editorial direction of episodes and more. She's produced episodes that look at gun violence in Oakland, a deep dive into the history of drag culture and interviews with folks like John Legend and Jennifer Lopez. She also produces live shows in places like Iowa and Chicago and directs weekly tapings of It's Been a Minute.

Sastry started her career at NPR on the flagship newsmagazine All Things Considered. In this role, Sastry led the show's social media team, was the lead producer for the 25th anniversary of the Los Angeles Riots series and reported in the Southwest and Mexico with Melissa Block and Elissa Nadworny for the special series Our Land.

She's worked as a producer for Marketplace and Press Play at KCRW, and her work has appeared in NPR's Life Kit, Morning Edition, Weekend All Things Considered and ABC News.

Sastry has been awarded for her work on It's Been a Minute by the Los Angeles Press Club and National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association. She is a co-founder of the Marginalized Genders and Intersex People of Color Mentorship Program at NPR. She and her co-founders received the NPR Diversity Success employee award for their work in 2018. She was also part of the inaugural 2018 Online News Association Journalism Mentorship Collaborative and has spoken about mentorship at Werk It: A Women's Podcast Festival and the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Story Archive

André Leon Talley attending "The Gospel According To André" premiere and Q&A at BMCC Tribeca PAC on April 25, 2018 in New York City. Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival hide caption

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Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Georgetown University and several other schools including Yale, MIT, and Notre Dame were named in a lawsuit alleging that they colluded to limit financial aid. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

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Supporters of former U.S. President Donald Trump gathering outside the Capitol building in Washington D.C., United States on January 06, 2021. Pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol as lawmakers were set to sign off President-elect Joe Biden's electoral victory in what was supposed to be a routine process headed to Inauguration Day. Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Revisiting the January 6 insurrection, one year later

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Whitney Houston sings the National Anthem prior to Super Bowl XXV on January 27, 1991. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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Looking back at Whitney Houston's 1991 national anthem

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Vanessa Hudgens, Vanessa Hudgens, and Vanessa Hudgens starring in The Princess Switch 3: Romancing the Star. Mark Mainz/NETFLIX © 2021/Mark Mainz/NETFLIX © 2021 hide caption

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Mark Mainz/NETFLIX © 2021/Mark Mainz/NETFLIX © 2021

The holiday movie machine

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U.S. President Joe Biden at the White House on December 01, 2021 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

What has Biden accomplished (or not) in 2021?

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Chicago charter school teacher Angela McByrd poses for a photo before starting her day working remotely as a teacher in Chicago, on Sept. 24, 2020. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Working from home doesn't have to suck. Here's how 'Out Of Office' can be better

Has working from home during the pandemic been frustrating for you? You're not alone. Charlie Warzel and Anne Helen Petersen's new book Out of Office: The Big Problem and Bigger Promise of Working from Home tackles how remote work can improve, no matter what industry you're in. They talk to Sam about how companies can create sustainable and flexible work environments, the history of workplace culture in the U.S., and how employees can maintain a healthy work-life balance.

Working from home doesn't have to suck. Here's how 'Out Of Office' can be better

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In August of 2021, more than 1,000 janitors with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) rallied and marched in Los Angeles, California ahead of their as their contracts expiring. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Was 2021 labor's year? Plus, 'Like a Virgin'

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Buy now, pay later and online returns are just a couple of the hidden costs of holiday shopping. the_burtons/Getty Images hide caption

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The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

A lot of consumers are worried about supply chain delays this holiday season — but there are also other issues to watch out for when shopping. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe talks about the hidden costs of holiday consumption with The Atlantic staff writer Amanda Mull and The Washington Post retail reporter Abha Bhattarai. They discuss the potential downfalls of buy now, pay later services and where online shopping returns really go. Then, they play a game of Who Said That?

The hidden costs of holiday consumerism

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Airplanes at gates and Control Tower at LAX; air travel has become increasingly difficult before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

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Why flying feels so hard; Plus, 'Queer Love in Color'

Now that more people are getting comfortable flying again, it's about time to remind ourselves that, oh yes, flying was sometimes terrible in the Before Times, too! And in 2021, that's still the case — if not more so — with cascading cancellations, staffing and plane shortages, and outbursts from passengers. Sam chats with Natalie Compton, travel reporter at The Washington Post, about the state of the airline industry heading into the holiday travel season... and how to get through it. Plus, author Jamal Jordan discusses his book 'Queer Love in Color,' and what it means to photograph and document queer intimacy. They're also joined by TV producer Hassan Williams for a game of Who Said That?

Why flying feels so hard; Plus, 'Queer Love in Color'

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Soul Train made its national television premiere 50 years ago, in October 1971. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

Massive icebergs from Jakobshavn Glacier melting in Disko Bay on sunny summer evening, Ilulissat, Greenland. Paul Souders/Getty Images hide caption

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Should I have kids? Move? Recycle? Your climate questions answered

Ahead of the U.N. climate talks in Glasgow this weekend, Sam chats with climate experts Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, marine biologist and writer, and Kendra Pierre-Louis, senior climate reporter with the podcast 'How to Save a Planet.' Together, they answer listener questions about everything from how to talk to your kids about global warming... to how to deal with all of this existential dread.

Should I have kids? Move? Recycle? Your climate questions answered

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Where We Come From: What's in a name?

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Shakira onstage during her MTV Unplugged performance, recorded in New York in 1999 and released as a live album in early 2000. Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music

Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion'

This week on Alt.Latino, we're featuring a special episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. From the three-part series exploring crossover in pop music, the podcast takes a look at the "Latin Explosion" of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Listen to our show

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