Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online.

Philip Ewing

National Security Editor

Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online. Ewing joined the network in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously he served as managing editor of Military.com and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Story Archive

U.S. Government Charges Russian With Interference In The 2018 Midterm Elections

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Russian honor guards perform during an international military and music festival on Moscow's Red Square in August. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images

Democrats accuse President Trump of intervening in the decisions involving the fate of the FBI's headquarters in Washington to help protect his hotel up the street. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Trump Intervened In FBI HQ Project To Protect His Hotel, Democrats Allege

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Democratic leaders including Rep. Jerry Nadler of New York faulted the White House on Wednesday for what they called "irresponsible" lumping of dissimilar Chinese and Russian influence schemes. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A Saudi Journalist Disappears in Turkey And Sets Off A Diplomatic Crisis

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Trump said on Twitter Tuesday that he welcomed the opportunity to take the offense against Stormy Daniels — whom he called "Horseface" — and lawyer Michael Avenatti in Texas, where Daniels lives. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Special counsel Robert Mueller is required to submit a confidential report when his work is done, but the publication and circulation of whatever he files is not a sure thing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Assistant U.S. Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers, left, speaks as U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania Scott W. Brady, 3rd from left, FBI Deputy Assistant Director for Cyber Division Eric Welling, 2nd from left, and Director General Mark Flynn, right, for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police listen during a news conference to announce criminal charges Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27. Ford's lawyers say she was not interviewed by the FBI for its supplemental investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein departs the U.S. Capitol through a basement corridor after House and Senate lawmakers from both parties met in a secure room for a classified briefing about the federal investigation into President Trump's 2016 campaign, in May. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP