Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online.

Philip Ewing

National Security Editor

Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online. Ewing joined the network in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously he served as managing editor of Military.com and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Story Archive

The inspector general's report has been hotly anticipated for months, but it does not conclude the saga over the Department of Justice, the FBI and the 2016 presidential election. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A new Justice Department report faulted the decisions in 2016 made by then-FBI Director James Comey. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Report Condemns FBI Violations In 2016 Clinton Probe But Finds No Political Bias

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Paul Manafort, President Trump's former campaign chairman, is facing more federal criminal charges along with a new Russian co-defendant. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch is expected to be faulted by a forthcoming inspector general's report set for release next week. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/Getty Images

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller leaves following a meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee at the U.S. Capitol last year. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Senate intelligence committee, led by Vice Chairman Mark Warner (left) and Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, appears to have arrived at a partisan deadlock over whether Donald Trump's campaign conspired with the Russian attack on the 2016 presidential election. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's chief of staff, John Kelly, arrives for a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

WH: Kelly, Attorney Flood Didn't Stay For Secret Portions of Russia Briefings

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