Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is an election security editor with NPR's Washington Desk.
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Philip Ewing

Philip Ewing

Election Security Editor

Philip Ewing is an election security editor with NPR's Washington Desk. He helps oversee coverage of election security, voting, disinformation, active measures and other issues. Ewing joined the Washington Desk from his previous role as NPR's national security editor, in which he helped direct coverage of the military, intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and more. He came to NPR in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously, he served as managing editor of Military.com, and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Members of the House Judiciary Committee listen as constitutional scholars testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill Wednesday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee (right), speaks as Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, listens during an impeachment inquiry hearing on Capitol Hill on Nov. 21. Andrew Harrer/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Getty Images

Trump Fires Navy Secretary; Will Allow Eddie Gallagher to Retire As Navy SEAL

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Fiona Hill, the National Security Council's former senior director for Europe and Russia, and David Holmes, an official from the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, testified in the House impeachment inquiry Thursday. Matt McClain/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/Pool/Getty Images

Former White House national security aide Fiona Hill and David Holmes, a U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, return from a break to continue their testimony before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Gordon Sondland, the U.S ambassador to the European Union, departs for a short break while testifying before the House Intelligence Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Jennifer Williams (right) and Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman are sworn in to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

"Was there a 'quid pro quo'?" Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland said in his opening remarks to House Intelligence Committee."With regard to the requested White House call and White House meeting, the answer is yes." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images