Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online.

Philip Ewing

National Security Editor

Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online. Ewing joined the network in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously he served as managing editor of Military.com and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Special counsel Robert Mueller is required to submit a confidential report when his work is done, but the publication and circulation of whatever he files is not a sure thing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Assistant U.S. Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers, left, speaks as U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania Scott W. Brady, 3rd from left, FBI Deputy Assistant Director for Cyber Division Eric Welling, 2nd from left, and Director General Mark Flynn, right, for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police listen during a news conference to announce criminal charges Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Christine Blasey Ford testifies before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27. Ford's lawyers say she was not interviewed by the FBI for its supplemental investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein departs the U.S. Capitol through a basement corridor after House and Senate lawmakers from both parties met in a secure room for a classified briefing about the federal investigation into President Trump's 2016 campaign, in May. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein's fate at the Justice Department appeared uncertain on Monday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Rosenstein Remains Deputy Attorney General Following White House Meeting — For Now

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Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein listens during a Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee earlier this month. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (from left), Attorney General Jeff Sessions and onetime acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe have all been political targets of President Trump's. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Rosenstein Denies That He Discussed Recording Trump, Invoking 25th Amendment

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Some senators have called for the FBI to investigate an accusation of sexual assault against Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Getting that to happen is not straightforward, though. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

After Paul Manafort's plea, the question now is what else Manafort has done, what he knows and what the office of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller might use in its investigations or prosecutions down the line. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, spoke with reporters following a day of questions from the House intelligence committee in November 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

According to Bob Woodward's upcoming book, a former Trump attorney thinks President Trump can't tell the truth long enough to talk with the special counsel's investigators about anything. Pool/Getty hide caption

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Pool/Getty

Asked whether Attorney General Jeff Sessions should investigate an anonymous opinion piece published by the New York Times, President Trump said he should. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images