Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online.

Philip Ewing

National Security Editor

Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online. Ewing joined the network in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously he served as managing editor of Military.com and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Story Archive

In this file photo taken on April 19, 2015, a women enters the four-story building known as the "troll factory" in St. Petersburg, Russia. The U.S. government alleges the Internet Research Agency started interfering as early as 2014 in U.S. politics, extending to the 2016 presidential election. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

The office of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller says 13 Russians and three Russian entities took part in a broad information war against the United States. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Grand Jury Indicts Russians Linked To Interference In 2016 Election

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Left to right: FBI Director Christopher Wray, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Robert Ashley, NSA Director Adm. Michael Rogers and National Geospatial Intelligence Agency Director Robert Cardillo testify before the Senate intelligence committee Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House intelligence committee, arrives to speak with the media after a closed-door meeting of the committee on Capitol Hill this week. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is recommending to the White House how much of a secret countermemo by intelligence committee Democrats should become public this week. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

President Trump is renewing his feud with the intelligence community as part of a campaign by his allies to make the case that the FBI and Justice Department are "biased." Win McNamee/AP hide caption

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Win McNamee/AP

The Justice Department and the FBI — and the rest of Washington's national security community — are bracing for what could be a major change in their relationship with Congress. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

After FBI Deputy Director McCabe Resigns, A Look At Where The Russia Investigation Stands

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Republicans used their majority on the House Intelligence Committee to authorize the release of Chairman Devin Nunes' memo. Democrats' rebuttal will remain classified. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Firing Robert Mueller, testifying in 2013 when he was FBI director, may have been discussed at the White House, which may or may not affect the special counsel's investigation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump sought to fire the special counsel but acquiesced when the White House's top lawyer didn't go along. That doesn't mean Mueller is out of danger. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images