Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online.

Philip Ewing

National Security Editor

Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online. Ewing joined the network in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously he served as managing editor of Military.com and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Story Archive

Deputy U.S. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has agreed that the Justice Department and the FBI will meet with members of Congress who want secret information about the Russia probe. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

WH Brokers, But Will Not Attend, Meeting About Secret Russia Probe Documents

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Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testifies about Russian interference in the 2016 election before a Senate Judiciary Committee subcommittee in May 2017. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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New records released by the Senate Judiciary Committee offer the most detail yet about a June 9, 2016, meeting at Trump Tower between top Trump campaign aides and a delegation of Russians after an offer of help in the contest against Hillary Clinton. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

The June 9, 2016, meeting at Trump Tower is one of several known contacts between Trump campaign workers and people connected with the Russian government. The Edge Digital Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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The Edge Digital Photography/Getty Images

Lawyers for Michael Cohen said an explosive document released about him this week was full of false information, although they did concede payments from some corporate clients. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Michael Cohen, longtime personal lawyer for President Trump, leaves federal court after his hearing at the United States District Court in the Southern District of New York on April 16. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/Getty Images

Trump Attorney Cohen May Have Received Russian Payments, New Document Alleges

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New York state's Senate is considering a bill that would permit authorities to prosecute someone under state law even if the person had been pardoned by the president for violation of federal law. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani says Justice Department "misconduct" is "accumulating," which is why the special counsel investigation must close. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee focusing on the oversight of the FBI in July 2010 on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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