Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online.
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Philip Ewing

Philip Ewing

National Security Editor

Philip Ewing is NPR's national security editor. He helps direct coverage of the military, the intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and other topics for the radio and online. Ewing joined the network in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously he served as managing editor of Military.com and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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President Trump, seen speaking to reporters at the White House on Monday, has fired his national security adviser. With John Bolton gone, what does that mean for Afghanistan peace talks and other major foreign policy? Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The U.S. has spent hundreds of millions of dollars since 2016 to make election practices at every level of government more secure. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

Facebook confirmed that it met with other tech companies and U.S. national security officials to discuss aligning efforts to safeguard the 2020 presidential election. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

"Deepfakes" are digitally altered images that make incidents appear real when they are not. Such altered files could have broad implications for politics. Marcus Marritt for NPR hide caption

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Marcus Marritt for NPR

Foreign interference continues to threaten U.S. elections in many forms, including the active spreading of disinformation. Marcus Marritt for NPR hide caption

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Marcus Marritt for NPR

Much of the fleet of electronic voting machines in the United States was designed without security in mind, in response to the last big national flap over an election in 2000. Marcus Marritt for NPR hide caption

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Marcus Marritt for NPR

Former FBI Director James Comey leaves the Rayburn House Office Building after testifying to the House Judiciary and Oversight committees on Capitol Hill on Dec. 7, 2018. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, won't be President Trump's nominee to serve as director of national intelligence after all, Trump said on Friday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

U.S. Federal Election Commission chief Ellen Weintraub has proposed new restrictions on foreign involvement in U.S. campaigns. A public comment period runs until the autumn. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Rep. John Ratcliffe, President Trump's nominee for the next director of national intelligence, listens as former special counsel Robert Mueller testified on Capitol Hill last week. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images