Philip Ewing Philip Ewing is an election security editor with NPR's Washington Desk.
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Philip Ewing

Philip Ewing

Election Security Editor

Philip Ewing is an election security editor with NPR's Washington Desk. He helps oversee coverage of election security, voting, disinformation, active measures and other issues. Ewing joined the Washington Desk from his previous role as NPR's national security editor, in which he helped direct coverage of the military, intelligence community, counterterrorism, veterans and more. He came to NPR in 2015 from Politico, where he was a Pentagon correspondent and defense editor. Previously, he served as managing editor of Military.com, and before that he covered the U.S. Navy for the Military Times newspapers.

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Story Archive

President Trump's personal attorney Jay Sekulow (center) stands with his son, Jordan Sekulow (left), and White House counsel Pat Cipollone in the Capitol on Saturday. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Trump Defense Team Makes Opening Arguments

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House impeachment manager Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., speaks during the impeachment trial against President Trump Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

Democrats Conclude Opening Arguments; Election Security Risks Persist

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House Manager Adam Schiff (center) leaves after speaking to reporters during the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump Friday. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Impeachment managers (from left) Reps. Adam Schiff, Zoe Lofgren, Jerry Nadler and Hakeem Jeffries head toward the Senate chamber for the start of President Trump's impeachment trial Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Intelligence Community Threats Executive Shelby Pierson told NPR that more nations may attempt more types of interference in the United States. "This isn't a Russia-only problem," she says. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

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Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, was among a group of Senate Republicans who insisted that the time each side has to make its case be extended. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the U.S. strike against a top Iranian military commander "fit perfectly within our strategy in how to counter the threat of malign activity from Iran." dpa Picture-Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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dpa Picture-Alliance via Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: Friday, January 3rd

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Iranians hold anti-U.S. banners during a demonstration in the capital, Tehran, following the killing of Qasem Soleimani by a U.S. drone strike. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California strikes the gavel after announcing the passage of article II of impeachment against President Trump on Wednesday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Doubt about the FBI and Justice Department's practices exploded after Inspector General Michael Horowitz released a report finding 17 omissions or other problems with filings connected to Carter Page, who served as a junior foreign policy aide to Donald Trump's campaign for a time in 2016. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images