Christianna Silva
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Christianna Silva

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Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear addresses the media following the return of a grand jury investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor in Frankfort, Ky., on Wednesday. Beshear has made a request to Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron to release the grand jury transcripts to the public. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Kentucky Governor: Breonna Taylor Grand Jury Transcripts Should Be Made Public

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A pregnant woman waits in line for groceries at a food pantry in Waltham, Mass., during the coronavirus pandemic. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Data Begin To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

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Kentucky Democratic State Sen. Charles Booker advocates for the passage of Kentucky HB-12 on the floor of the House of Representatives in the State Capitol, Frankfort, Ky., on Feb. 19, 2020. Bryan Woolston/AP hide caption

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Bryan Woolston/AP

'Justice Failed Us,' Ky. State Rep. Booker Says Of Breonna Taylor Decision

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Poll workers at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department deposit returned mail-in ballots into an official ballot drop box on primary election day on Aug. 18 in Doral, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How A Florida Elections Official Is Leaning On Creativity During A Complicated Year

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Bishop Michael Curry gave a sermon at the 2018 royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, at St. George's Chapel, in Windsor, England. Steve Parsons/Pool / Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Parsons/Pool / Getty Images

Bishop Michael Curry Preaches The Power Of Love To Find 'Hope In Troubling Times'

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President Trump's latest flagged social media posts come just days after the North Carolina State Board of Elections reminded voters that it is illegal to cast a ballot twice, in response to another series of disputed tweets from Trump. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Protesters raise their fist in the air in front of law enforcement last month in Kenosha, Wis., after the police shooting of Jacob Blake. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

People march during the nationwide protest demanding the end to the Trump administration in New York City on Saturday. Protesters have often accused President Trump of being fascist. Aidan Loughran/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Aidan Loughran/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Fascism Scholar Says U.S. Is 'Losing Its Democratic Status'

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Jacob Blake answers questions during a hearing Friday, Sept. 4 in Kenosha, Wis. Blake, who appeared remotely, waived his right to a preliminary hearing — and then pleaded not guilty to three charges that were filed against him back in July. Kenosha County Court/AP hide caption

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Kenosha County Court/AP

Demonstrators lock arms as they march for Daniel Prude on Friday in Rochester, N.Y. Prude died after being arrested on March 23 by Rochester police officers, who had placed a "spit hood" over his head and pinned him to the ground while restraining him. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

"We should not live in a nation where your access to democracy depends on your celebrity, your wealth, or your ZIP code," says Stacey Abrams. Above, the former Georgia gubernatorial candidate addresses the virtual Democratic National Convention on Aug. 18. Handout/DNCC via Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/DNCC via Getty Images

In New Documentary, Stacey Abrams Probes The State Of Voter Suppression In 2020

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Demonstrators gather Thursday in New York City to demand justice for Daniel Prude, who died of asphyxiation after police restrained him. Participants gathered at Times Square and marched to Columbus Circle. Karla Ann Coté/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Karla Ann Coté/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Joe Prude Remembers His Brother Daniel Following His Death In Police Custody

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A researcher takes blood samples from a patient as she participates in a COVID-19 vaccine study last month at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Operation Warp Speed Top Adviser On The Status Of A Coronavirus Vaccine

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The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa makes up a sizeable portion of the city's population of roughly 100,000. Mayor Walt Maddox says losing an entire semester of school would be "economically disastrous for our community." Wesley Hitt/Getty Images hide caption

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Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

Mayors Of College Towns Brace For The Economic Impact Of Remote Learning

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