Emma Bowman
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Emma Bowman

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At StoryCorps in Littleton, Colo., last month, siblings Lauren Cartaya and Zach Cartaya said they continue to cope with the trauma of the 1999 Columbine shooting. Kevin Oliver/StoryCorps hide caption

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Kevin Oliver/StoryCorps

20 Years Later, Sibling Columbine Survivors Reflect

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A pine tree lies across what remains of a trailer on Center Hill Road outside of Hamilton, Miss., after a deadly storm moved through the area on Sunday. Jim Lytle/AP hide caption

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Jim Lytle/AP

Lauren Cox (#15) of the Baylor Bears shoots over Brianna Turner (#11) of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish at Amalie Arena Sunday night in Tampa, Fla. Ben Solomon/NCAA Photos via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Solomon/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

It's Poetry Month. Tweet us your mini poems all April using the hashtag #NPRPoetry. bortonia/Getty Images hide caption

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bortonia/Getty Images

Listen: Richard Blanco

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Nina Martinez has become the first living HIV-positive organ donor. Above, Martinez is pictured with her surgeon, Dr. Dorry Segev of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Johns Hopkins Medicine hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Medicine

1st Living HIV-Positive Organ Donor Wants To Lift 'The Shroud Of HIV Related Stigma'

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Women and children evacuated out of the last territory held by Islamic State militants wait to be screened by U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) in the desert outside Baghouz, Syria, on Feb. 27. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

With The Collapse Of The ISIS 'Caliphate,' A Camera Lens Lingers On Those Left Behind

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Shotzy Harrison in 2013 with her father, James Flavy Coy Brown, at StoryCorps in Winston-Salem, N.C. Not long after, Brown, then 49, left his daughter's home and she hasn't seen him since. Anita Rao/StoryCorps hide caption

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Anita Rao/StoryCorps

A Father-Daughter Relationship Strained By 'Mental Illness And Time'

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A tornado-damaged house is seen March 4 in Beauregard, Ala. Rescuers in Alabama were set to resume search operations Monday after tornadoes killed 23 people, uprooted trees and caused "catastrophic" damage to buildings and roads."The devastation is incredible," Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones told the local CBS affiliate late Sunday. Tami Chappell/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tami Chappell/AFP/Getty Images

The Verge's Casey Newton reported on the high-pressure work of Facebook content moderators. "Almost everyone I spoke with could vividly describe for me at least one thing they saw that continues to haunt them," he tells NPR's Scott Simon. Iain Masterton/Getty Images/Canopy hide caption

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Iain Masterton/Getty Images/Canopy

Propaganda, Hate Speech, Violence: The Working Lives Of Facebook's Content Moderators

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Mickey Willenbring tends to one of her Navajo-Churro sheep at Dot Ranch in Scio, Ore. Tim Herrera hide caption

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Tim Herrera

After Combat, A Veteran Finds Solace In Sheep Farming

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Miles Morales became the first non-white Spider-Man to hit the big screen last year in Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse. Sony Pictures Animation hide caption

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Sony Pictures Animation

Peter Ramsey Put The 1st Afro-Latino Spider-Man On Screen. It May Win Him An Oscar

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Department of State Spokesperson Heather Nauert withdrew herself from consideration for the nomination of U.S. ambassador to the U.N. on Saturday. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Thanks in part to his original songwriting, singing and guitar-playing, Physics doctoral student Pramodh Senarath Yapa beat out the remaining entrants to win this year's "Dance Your Ph.D." contest. Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall hide caption

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Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall

Ph.D. Student Breaks Down Electron Physics Into A Swinging Musical

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Sharon and Larry Adams, pictured in January 2016 in the Milwaukee home where their nonprofit, Walnut Way, is based. Adam Carr hide caption

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Adam Carr

How One Couple's Love Story Sparked Change In Their Community, Block By Block

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"You can't tell me that a movie that I'm doing about a story that involves black culture is not going to reach other corners of the world," Taraji P. Henson says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

'What Men Want' Actor Taraji P. Henson Talks Fighting 'Like A Girl'

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