Emma Bowman

Story Archive

Queen Elizabeth II waves to the audience after a speech from her eldest son Charles, Prince of Wales, at the end of a star-studded concert to celebrate her 92nd birthday at Royal Albert Hall on Saturday. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Ralph Gagliardo was incarcerated for much of his daughter Abby's childhood. At StoryCorps, they talk about their relationship while he was in prison and after he returned home. Daniel Sitts/StoryCorps hide caption

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Daniel Sitts/StoryCorps

'We Came A Long Way': After Prison, A New Chance For A Dad And His Daughter

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We've been devouring your miniature poems in honor of National Poetry Month. Keep tweeting us your verses using the hashtag #NPRpoetry. myillo/Getty Images hide caption

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myillo/Getty Images

Can Poetry Be Translated?

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Dennis Simmonds, 57, and his wife Roxanne, 54, during a visit to StoryCorps. Kevin Oliver for StoryCorps hide caption

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Kevin Oliver for StoryCorps

'He Wasn't Really Afraid Of Anything': Boston Bombing Victim Remembered

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Poet Jessica Care Moore performs at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2014. Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images for Brooklyn Academy of Music hide caption

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Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images for Brooklyn Academy of Music

Don't Put Yourself In A Box, Unless It's On Twitter: Detroit Poet Reads #NPRpoetry

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Davis, center, during his deployment to Afghanistan, where he served for nearly a year and a half as a human intelligence collector. Courtesy of Roman Coley Davis hide caption

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Courtesy of Roman Coley Davis

A Young Soldier Finds Comfort In An Unexpected Delivery

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Brothers Russell Wadsworth, 28, (left) and Remmick Wadsworth, 27, both have autism. "To have a brother who shares something that you have, the same kind of emotions ... it just means the world," Russell tells his younger brother during a StoryCorps interview. Kevin Oliver/Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Kevin Oliver/Courtesy of StoryCorps

'You Would Always Have My Back': Brothers With Autism Navigate Life Together

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Visitors sit beside a model of China's Tiangong-1 space station in 2010, at the 8th China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition in Zhuhai in southern China's Guangdong Province. As forecast, China's defunct Tiangong 1 space station re-entered Earth's atmosphere Sunday. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Stephen Yorkman of the Prince George's County chapter of the National African American Gun Association fires a 9mm handgun at the Maryland Small Arms Range in Upper Marlboro, Md., in March 2017. J. Lawler Duggan/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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J. Lawler Duggan/The Washington Post/Getty Images

African-American Gun Rights Group Grows In The Age Of Trump

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A 1950 photo of Kay (aka "Tubby") Johnston in her King's Dairy Little League team uniform hangs in a special exhibit honoring women in baseball, at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Courtesy of Kay Johnston Massar hide caption

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Courtesy of Kay Johnston Massar

A Little League Of Her Own: The First Girl In Little League Baseball

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At their StoryCorps interview in Houston, Tanai Benard, 34, and her son, Dezmond Floyd, 10, discuss what's become a grim yet routine topic at schools: active shooter drills. Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps hide caption

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Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps

'There Is No Handbook For This': A Mother And Son Talk About School Shootings

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