Emma Bowman
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Emma Bowman

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Department of State Spokesperson Heather Nauert withdrew herself from consideration for the nomination of U.S. ambassador to the U.N. on Saturday. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Thanks in part to his original songwriting, singing and guitar-playing, Physics doctoral student Pramodh Senarath Yapa beat out the remaining entrants to win this year's "Dance Your Ph.D." contest. Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall hide caption

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Courtesy of Matthias Le Dall

Ph.D. Student Breaks Down Electron Physics Into A Swinging Musical

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Sharon and Larry Adams, pictured in January 2016 in the Milwaukee home where their nonprofit, Walnut Way, is based. Adam Carr hide caption

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Adam Carr

How One Couple's Love Story Sparked Change In Their Community, Block By Block

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"You can't tell me that a movie that I'm doing about a story that involves black culture is not going to reach other corners of the world," Taraji P. Henson says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

'What Men Want' Actor Taraji P. Henson Talks Fighting 'Like A Girl'

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Maya Altman and her mother, Robyn Altman, visit StoryCorps in Parkland, Fla., to reflect on the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Madison Mullen/StoryCorps hide caption

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Madison Mullen/StoryCorps

A Year After Parkland, A Mother And Daughter Remember

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Rodger McDaniel remembers his late father at his StoryCorps interview in Laramie, Wyo. Rachel Falcone /StoryCorps hide caption

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Rachel Falcone /StoryCorps

How A Long-Lost Guitar Was A Lesson In Grace And Forgiveness

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Henry Winkler, who has dyslexia, has spent his life struggling to read books. "It never dawned on me that I would have my name on a book," Winkler tells NPR's Michel Martin. Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Dyslexia Made Henry Winkler Feel 'Stupid' For Years. Now, He's A Best-Selling Author

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Los Angeles Rams head coach Sean McVay celebrates with Greg Zuerlein after a game-winning field goal during overtime of the NFL's NFC championship game against the New Orleans Saints on Sunday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

"It feels like confessing a crime," Tommy Tomlinson says about revealing his weight in his new book, The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America. Courtesy of Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

He Was 460 Pounds. What Confronting His Weight Taught Him About Obesity In America

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In August 1963, African-American girls were held in a Georgia stockade after being arrested for demonstrating segregation. Left to right: Melinda Jones Williams (13), Laura Ruff Saunders (13), Mattie Crittenden Reese, Pearl Brown, Carol Barner Seay (12), Annie Ragin Laster (14), Willie Smith Davis (15), Shirley Green (14), and Billie Jo Thornton Allen (13). Sitting on the floor: Verna Hollis (15). Danny Lyon hide caption

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Danny Lyon

'I Gave Up Hope': As Girls, They Were Jailed In Squalor For Protesting Segregation

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Maria Rivas and her 15-year-old daughter, Emily, embrace after their StoryCorps interview last month. Mia Warren/StoryCorps hide caption

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Mia Warren/StoryCorps

A Mom And Her Teenage Daughter Brace For A Future Apart

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American civil rights activist Bayard Rustin, pictured in 1964, as spokesman for the Citywide Committee for Integration, at the organization's headquarters, Silcam Presbyterian Church in New York City. Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images

In Newly Found Audio, A Forgotten Civil Rights Leader Says Coming Out 'Was An Absolute Necessity'

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The federal website where consumers can sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act is shown on a computer screen in Washington, D.C., last month. The federal judge in Texas, who earlier this month ruled the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, said that the law can remain in effect while under appeal. AP hide caption

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AP

Richard Beebe cherishes this quilt in memory of his wife, Eileen. Courtesy of Richard Beebe hide caption

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Courtesy of Richard Beebe

Holiday Traditions : Sonia Ha

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Jeanne Satterfield, left, and Barbara Parham, stand in front of Boston's Pine Street Inn homeless shelter in October, where they reconnected for the first time in a decade. They plan to return to the shelter next week to help out for the holidays. Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps hide caption

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Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps

Reconnecting 10 Years Later 'Was The True Test Of Friendship And Time'

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