Emma Bowman
Emma Bowman, photographed for NPR, 27 July 2019, in Washington DC.
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Emma Bowman

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Personnel enter and exit the NHL bubble in Toronto, one of two host cities, along with Edmonton, where the league has resumed its season. Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images

NHL Commissioner On How The League Keeps Athletes Safe: 'Be As Flexible As Possible'

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A journalist runs past federal officers during a protest against racial injustice in front of the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse on July 30 in Portland, Ore. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman talks to reporters in January at the Capitol in Olympia about a series of election and ballot security bills her office is asking the state Legislature to consider during the current session. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Mail-In Voting Is 'Not Rampant Voter Fraud,' Says Washington's Top Election Official

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A patient in a first-stage study of a potential vaccine for COVID-19 receives a shot in March at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Public Health Expert Calls To Repair Distrust In A COVID-19 Vaccine

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In San Francisco, a poster seen in March urges the public to socially distance in an effort to contain the spread of the coronavirus. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Health Experts Urge A Shutdown Do-Over As COVID-19 Cases Surge

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Judy Heumann, a founder of the disability civil rights movement, reflects on the changes ushered in by the Americans with Disabilities Act, three decades after it was signed into law. Joe Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Joe Shapiro/NPR

One Laid Groundwork For The ADA; The Other Grew Up Under Its Promises

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School buses sit parked at a lot in Marietta, Ga., in March. Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp has pushed for students to return to school in the fall, but the state's largest system, in Gwinnett County, has decided on all-virtual learning. Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images

As Georgia Governor Calls To Reopen Schools, Largest District Will Teach Online Only

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Kenneth Felts and his daughter, Rebecca Mayes, spoke about Felts' first love during a remote StoryCorps conversation in Arvada, Colo. Courtesy of Kenneth Felts and Rebecca Mayes for StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of Kenneth Felts and Rebecca Mayes for StoryCorps

Love Lost, Truth Found: In Pandemic Isolation, A Father Comes Out To His Daughter

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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp gave a coronavirus briefing at the Capitol Friday, in Atlanta. Kemp has filed a lawsuit against the city over its face-mask requirement. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Georgia Mayor 'Disappointed' By Governor's Order Blocking Mask Mandates

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Raphael Bostic, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, says his organization has a big role to play in reducing racial economic inequities, which he says, is crucial to a stable economy. Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Racism Has An Economic Cost, Atlanta Fed President Warns

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Hadiyah-Nicole Green and Tenika Floyd at their StoryCorps interview in Atlanta in January 2017. Jacqueline Van Meter for StoryCorps hide caption

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Jacqueline Van Meter for StoryCorps

'It Was Personal.' After Tragedy, Physicist Devotes Career To Cancer Research

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Jane Elliott, an educator and anti-racism activist, first conducted her blue eyes/brown eyes exercise in her third-grade classroom in Iowa in 1968. Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

We Are Repeating The Discrimination Experiment Every Day, Says Educator Jane Elliott

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Vivian Garcia Leonard (left); Marissa Sofia Ochs (middle), holding her daughter, Liana; and Vivian J. Leonard (right) talk about being pharmacists in New York, a city that has been especially hard hit during the coronavirus pandemic. Camila Kerwin for StoryCorps hide caption

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Camila Kerwin for StoryCorps

3 Generations Of Pharmacists Reflect On The Coronavirus Pandemic

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Rugenia Keefe, left, a paraprofessional who assisted Cole Phillips for most of high school after he lost his sight, spoke with the graduating senior for a remote conversation from Bentonville, Ark. Courtesy of Cole Phillips hide caption

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Courtesy of Cole Phillips

He Went Blind Before High School. His Teacher Aide Thanks Him For 'Saving' Her

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