Ryan Lucas
Ryan Lucas in 2018
Stories By

Ryan Lucas

Allison Shelley/NPR
Ryan Lucas in 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ryan Lucas

Justice Correspondent

Ryan Lucas covers the Justice Department for NPR.

He focuses on the national security side of the Justice beat, including counterterrorism and counterintelligence. Lucas also covers a host of other justice issues, including the Trump administration's "tough-on-crime" agenda and anti-trust enforcement.

Before joining NPR, Lucas worked for a decade as a foreign correspondent for The Associated Press based in Poland, Egypt and Lebanon. In Poland, he covered the fallout from the revelations about secret CIA prisons in Eastern Europe. In the Middle East, he reported on the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and the turmoil that followed. He also covered the Libyan civil war, the Syrian conflict and the rise of the Islamic State. He reported from Iraq during the U.S. occupation and later during the Islamic State takeover of Mosul in 2014.

He also covered intelligence and national security for Congressional Quarterly.

Lucas earned a bachelor's degree from The College of William and Mary, and a master's degree from Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

8 People Charged Over Alleged Role In Chinese Government Operation In The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/928805782/928805783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers speaks during a virtual news conference at the Department of Justice, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020 with FBI Director Christopher Wray. Sarah Silbiger/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Silbiger/AP

E. Jean Carroll (left), who has accused President Trump of raping her in the 1990s, leaves federal court in New York City after a hearing last week in her defamation lawsuit. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

The U.S. Justice Department is suing Google, accusing the tech giant of breaking antitrust laws as it has amassed power and grown into the world's most dominant search engine. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Google Abuses Its Monopoly Power Over Search, Justice Department Says In Lawsuit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/925736276/925795277" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

6 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged In High-Profile Cyberattacks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/925501032/925501033" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Assistant Attorney General John C. Demers of the Justice Department's National Security Division, pictured on Oct. 7, has announced new charges against Russians allegedly connected to the Russian military intelligence agency GRU. Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

DOJ Unveils More Sweeping Cyber-Charges Against Russian Intelligence Officers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/925423705/925678259" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam was mentioned as a potential target for kidnapping when a group met to discuss plots to punish governors for their response to the coronavirus, the FBI says. Northam is seen here at a news conference in June in Richmond. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Alexanda Kotey, left, and El Shafee Elsheikh were indicted Wednesday on eight counts. The ISIS militants are accused of being part of an ISIS cell dubbed "the Beatles" in the killings of four American hostages and others. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hussein Malla/AP

DOJ To Charge 2 British Nationals Suspected Of Being ISIS Members

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/920859137/920859138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alexanda Kotey (left) and El Shafee Elsheikh, who were allegedly among four British jihadis who made up a brutal Islamic State cell dubbed "The Beatles," speak during an interview with The Associated Press at a security center in Kobani, Syria, in March 2018. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hussein Malla/AP