Ryan Lucas
Ryan Lucas in 2018
Stories By

Ryan Lucas

Allison Shelley/NPR
Ryan Lucas in 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ryan Lucas

Justice Correspondent

Ryan Lucas covers the Justice Department for NPR.

He focuses on the national security side of the Justice beat, including counterterrorism and counterintelligence. Lucas also covers a host of other justice issues, including the Trump administration's "tough-on-crime" agenda and anti-trust enforcement.

Before joining NPR, Lucas worked for a decade as a foreign correspondent for The Associated Press based in Poland, Egypt and Lebanon. In Poland, he covered the fallout from the revelations about secret CIA prisons in Eastern Europe. In the Middle East, he reported on the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and the turmoil that followed. He also covered the Libyan civil war, the Syrian conflict and the rise of the Islamic State. He reported from Iraq during the U.S. occupation and later during the Islamic State takeover of Mosul in 2014.

He also covered intelligence and national security for Congressional Quarterly.

Lucas earned a bachelor's degree from The College of William and Mary, and a master's degree from Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

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Story Archive

Proud Boy members Joseph Biggs (left) and Ethan Nordean, carrying a megaphone, walk toward the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. A federal judge ordered them detained pending trial given the conspiracy charges against them. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Member Of The Oath Keepers First To Plea Guilty In U.S. Capitol Attack Investigation

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After Almost Two Decades Of War, Biden To Withdraw Troops From Afghanistan

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Stewart Rhodes, founder of Oath Keepers, is pictured in Forth Worth, Texas, on Feb. 28. A number of Oath Keepers members or associates are under investigation for the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Aaron C. Davis/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron C. Davis/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Who Are The Oath Keepers? Militia Group, Founder Scrutinized In Capitol Riot Probe

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Securing the Capitol or Fencing in Democracy? And, Biden's Policy Strategy

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Oath Keepers Founder Is Under Scrutiny, Court Documents Show

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Thousands of supporters of former President Donald Trump storm the U.S. Capitol following a "Stop the Steal" rally on Jan. 6. Prosecutors are working on hundreds of charges related to the breach. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Capitol Conspiracy Cases Show Plans For Violence, Not Necessarily For Breach

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Oath Keepers, Proud Boys Are Under Intense Scrutiny Following Capitol Riot

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Attorney General Merrick Garland, pictured on March 11, said Friday the Justice Department will continue its effort to deter and punish coronavirus-related fraud. Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AFP via Getty Images

Then-acting U.S. Attorney Michael Sherwin speaks during a news conference on Jan. 12. After an interview Sherwin gave about the ongoing Capitol insurrection investigation, a federal judge criticized the Justice Department with a potential gag order. Sarah Silbiger/AP hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/AP

Biden Administration Turns Attention To Anti-Asian Hate

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Proud Boy members Joseph Biggs (left) and Ethan Nordean, carrying a megaphone, walk toward the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. They were among four people indicted over conspiring to attack the Capitol. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP