Ryan Lucas
Ryan Lucas in 2018
Stories By

Ryan Lucas

Allison Shelley/NPR
Ryan Lucas in 2018
Allison Shelley/NPR

Ryan Lucas

Justice Correspondent

Ryan Lucas covers the Justice Department for NPR.

He focuses on the national security side of the Justice beat, including counterterrorism and counterintelligence. Lucas also covers a host of other justice issues, including the Trump administration's "tough-on-crime" agenda and anti-trust enforcement.

Before joining NPR, Lucas worked for a decade as a foreign correspondent for The Associated Press based in Poland, Egypt and Lebanon. In Poland, he covered the fallout from the revelations about secret CIA prisons in Eastern Europe. In the Middle East, he reported on the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and the turmoil that followed. He also covered the Libyan civil war, the Syrian conflict and the rise of the Islamic State. He reported from Iraq during the U.S. occupation and later during the Islamic State takeover of Mosul in 2014.

He also covered intelligence and national security for Congressional Quarterly.

Lucas earned a bachelor's degree from The College of William and Mary, and a master's degree from Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland.

Story Archive

New York AG James says Trump's company misled banks, tax officials

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The leader of the Oath Keepers is charged with conspiracy for Jan. 6 riot

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Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, speaks during a 2017 rally outside the White House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Oath Keepers leader arrested, charged with seditious conspiracy for Jan. 6 riot

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The Justice Department building on a foggy morning in 2019 in Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Justice Department will create domestic terrorism unit to counter rising threats

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Security fences are positioned near the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, a day ahead of the first anniversary of the Jan. 6 insurrection. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Where the Jan. 6 insurrection investigation stands, one year later

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District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine announced on Tuesday that the District of Columbia is suing the Oath Keepers and Proud Boys for damages from the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

D.C.'s attorney general is suing the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers over Capitol attack

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A Harvard scientist, accused of lying about his links to China, goes on trial

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The U.S. Court of Appeals has rejected former President Donald Trump's effort to stop the release of some documents to the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

The FBI is trying to add diversity to its ranks by recruiting at HBCUs

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Associate Attorney General Vanita Gupta, joined by Attorney General Merrick Garland, announces that the Justice Department was suing Texas over its recent redistricting map. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Former Trump Chief of Staff Mark Meadows will appear before the Jan. 6 panel

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A memorial is seen outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., in honor of those killed during a 2018 mass shooting. Families of more than a dozen victims have reached a legal settlement with the Justice Department. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images